Deepening Audience Engagement With Long-Form Content

October 18, 2017

Communicating complicated ideas can be a significant challenge for social change organizations trying to reach diverse audiences in a short-attention-span world. But it's something long-form content is particularly well suited for. If your organization publishes research, reports, and other types of long-form content, what strategies can you use to ensure that your content resonates with and engages your target audiences?

Audience-Engagement-bubblesDigital communications and social media have had a tremendous impact on our ability to maintain focus and attention — not just online, but in the real world. Online and offline, we are awash in content that's fragmented and comes at us fast. Distractions are everywhere and, for social change organizations, creating awareness around complex issues can feel like an uphill battle.

But even as short-form platforms like Twitter increasingly shape how issues are framed by the media, recent studies show that when it comes to audience engagement, long-form content performs better than shorter content. So, while we may live in a world dominated by short bursts of commentary, opinion, and insights, long-form content remains a critical (and effective!) format.

While every organization with a message to communicate has to learn how to navigate this dynamic, social change organizations face a bigger challenge. Because when your mission revolves around a complicated issue, is connected to a problem in a far-away place or the distant future, or is just removed from the concerns of everyday life, maintaining audience engagement is inherently more difficult.

Still, it usually boils down to the same question: How can we elevate our issue or cause and engage our target audiences? The time-tested principles used by storytellers since, well, forever are an excellent place to start.

Leveraging Narrative Structure

Whether presented as narrative or as academic research, all long-form content can benefit from the three-act structure of exposition, confrontation, and resolution familiar to professional storytellers. In general, it works like this:

Invite your audience in. Whenever you are asking an audience to engage with a longer narrative, it’s important to invite them in to the narrative by stating up front the things you have in common. Establishing a shared understanding and creating common ground with your audience — and appealing to their "better angels" when appropriate — makes it that much easier to pivot to the more complex ideas you need them to engage with and to share new perspectives they are likely to value.

Establish your "characters." Establishing common ground with audience members also earns you their interest and attention — equity you can use to deepen their engagement with your issue or cause. In storytelling, effective writers use this equity to establish their "characters" and the underlying relationships that animate them. Keep in mind, characters don't need to be actual people — they can be a commonly held belief, a way of doing things, or an entire system that impacts your mission. Whether you're sharing a traditional narrative or specialized academic content, it's important to establish this framework sooner rather than later, and to supply important details that will deepen your audience's commitment to, and understanding of, the issue at hand.

Introduce a catalyst. By this point, your audience should both be familiar with your issue and inclined to commit themselves to learning more about it. It's time to elevate their interest by revealing the catalyst! For social change organizations, a catalyst could be a new way of addressing systemic inequity or research that offers insights into how to think about social change in a new way. Whatever the case, your goal is to provide a compelling reason for your readers to step up their investment in your work. And the more complex the issue, the more important it is to clearly lay out the related activities and/or outcomes that are part of the catalyst. Done well, you'll create a connection with your audience that boosts their willingness to engage with and support your mission.

Create a resolution. For many social change organizations, impact is something that happens in the future (sometimes the distant future). The delay in being able to demonstrate results is a major challenge for social change organizations working to address deep-rooted problems such as poverty, structural racism, or climate change. So if your audience is still engaged with your long-form content at this point (and you certainly hope they are), it's critical to offer them some kind of resolution. Depending on the nature of your organization, that resolution can take a number of forms — a satisfying conclusion to a story about impact, a roundup of resources they can use to further their own change-related efforts, and/or a list of things they can do to strengthen their engagement with your organization.

Again, whether your content falls into the emotional narrative category or is fact-based research, the key to deepening audience engagement is maintaining an equal focus on both its structure and substance. And the same best practices that work online can be applied to any medium or format.

Tips for Content Creators

Now that you have a better understanding of the principles of effective narrative, here are some recommendations for crafting compelling long-form content that will deepen audience engagement and spur potential supporters to action:

Be consistently thoughtful. The bar for high-quality long-form content is, well, high. And with so much content so readily available, ensuring that your content is respected, remembered, and returned to means making sure it always speaks to and reinforces your organization's credibility, delivers meaningful value, and provides a great reading experience.

Editorial creativity is paramount. To spark and sustain engagement, long-form content needs to be focused and well structured. To keep your audience's attention, try alternating between simplicity and complexity. Punctuate deeper dives into an issue with simple summaries and key insights. Doing so will not only underscore and amplify what's at stake, it will make it easier to move on to the next idea you need to communicate.

Empathy is important, but... Successful communications is about more than just making sure your ideas are clear, concise, and well-stated. It's about meeting your audience wherever they are (i.e., creating common ground). That said, conveying empathy isn't about purple prose or being gratuitously emotional. Instead, it requires establishing a genuine, meaningful connection to the people you are hoping to engage on terms that resonate with them, and building trust.

Make sure your audience doesn’t get lost. Consistency and clear expectations are critical to building trust — especially in long-form content that requires a greater commitment from your audience (and even more so online). Both in the language you use and the actual vehicles you create for your content, cues designed to orient audience members within the reading experience can reduce cognitive load, improve content accessibility, and create a sense of anticipation that keeps audience members reading.

Provide a place to rest. Giving your audience members conceptual places to take a break is a great way to reduce the fatigue often associated with reading long-form content. Analogy, metaphor, and digression are tried-true techniques that, when executed well, can reinforce context, add needed perspective, and reinforce reader understanding. From a design perspective, creating visually (and conceptually) separate material such as sidebars is also an excellent way to introduce a change of pace into complex material.

Don’t be afraid to pick a fight! As our name suggests, Constructive is all about positive dialogue. But that doesn't mean we don't appreciate the importance of taking clear positions and standing up for what we believe is right. If the issue your organization is working to address requires you to take a stand, you can strengthen your case by contrasting your position with the position of those who see the issue differently and explaining in clear terms what's at stake.

Leave your audiences wanting more. Every piece of content you share with your target audiences should leave them better informed and feeling energized. But the next steps are crucial. You need to give them a rationale for wanting to help you advance your cause, including a range of actions and an explanation of why their actions will create more impact when combined with the actions of like-minded people (as always, the whole is greater than the sum of the parts!).

In Conclusion

We create content in hopes that people will engage with our ideas. Storytelling has long been one of humanity's most powerful ways of translating ideas into action. While sharing our ideas through digital communications may be different than telling stories around a campfire, the fundamental principles are the same.

To truly engage an audience, digital content must be meaningful and deliver value — wherever and however an audience chooses to consume it. In a world of too many choices, sustaining online engagement requires that we design and deliver experiences that highlight the alignment of our ideas and activities to the interests of our audience. When ideas are presented in a way that our audience finds to be both accessible and useful, those ideas will be shared with others. At Constructive, we call that a win-win!

Headshot_matt_schwartzMatt Schwartz is the founder and director of strategy at Constructive, a New York City-based brand strategy and experience design firm dedicated to helping social change organizations achieve greater impact.

Best Practices for Implementing New Software

October 16, 2017

Puzzle_cooperation_250If your foundation or charity is thinking about implementing new software, it's essential you have a well-thought-out technology strategy in place before proceeding. Such a strategy should include a holistic view of the pros and cons of the software under consideration, buy-in from key stakeholders, and a focus on ROI as well as costs.

Of course, any software implementation should be a team effort that has been blessed by leadership and is conducted in real partnership with the software implementer. Settling on a software solution that solves one problem for a single department without thinking through the entire organization's technology needs and ecosystem can lead to more problems than it solves, including:

  • a fatal lack of buy-in from staff and management;
  • technology needs that go unaddressed;
  • duplication of effort; and
  • lack of systems integration.

At the same time, selecting a vendor based on a solution's cosmetic features while ignoring the implementer's competence and capacity can also cause problems. Unfortunately, many foundations and nonprofits are laser-focused on initial costs and frequently ignore longer-term return-on-investment (ROI) calculations, especially when it comes to choosing a firm to implement a solution. As a result, organizations often end up with software that is inexpensive but does nothing to drive impact or improve their bottom lines.

Indeed, software solutions that appear to be inexpensive at first glance can result in significant unaccounted-for costs during the implementation process. Which is why forward-thinking organizations look for solutions that can help them advance their mission and yield a better-than-average return on investment.

Here are five types of software that are useful for foundations and grantmaking charities:

  1. CRM: Provides a holistic view of the constituent experience across the entire organization.
  2. Fundraising: Gives a clear view of performance and yield (including data enrichment services), processes donations, and helps empower your organization's “evangelists” to raise money on your behalf.
  3. Financial: Provides in-depth record keeping and custom reports that allow you to drill down into your finances.
  4. Grants management and impact measurement: Identifies, tracks, and measures the impact of grants and gifts (both cash and in-kind) against concrete outcomes.
  5. Analytics: Is used to harness the power of data and connect with constituents, highlight areas of operational improvement, and generate insights into potential organizational investments.

So how can organizations set themselves up for long-term success once they've chosen one or more of the above solutions? Here are five best software implementation practices:

  1. Align on expectations. Prior to implementation, set goals with your implementation specialist, share and confirm that all requirements are aligned with organizational expectations, construct a timeline, and get final sign off on the steps in the process.
  2. Appoint a project manager. Once expectations have been outlined and agreed to, appoint a key stakeholder from your team to serve as project manager. The project manager should also be the main point of contact for your software partner's representative.
  3. Focus on the partnership. Once a project plan has been agreed to, discuss and determine the most efficient method of communication between your team and your software partner, as well as the frequency of communications (once a week? biweekly? monthly?). Also, be sure to finalize how best to share and collaborate on all documents created and maintained during the project.
  4. Develop checkpoints. Building checkpoints into the project plan will ensure that your goals and expectations are being met and that any questions are answered in a timely and responsive manner. The objective here is to eliminate miscommunication and make sure that all parties to the agreement are held accountable for their deliverables. We often hear, for example, about a system that has gone live without historical data. If something like that occurs, everyone involved needs to know who made the decision and why it was made. Having checkpoints with specific approval criteria helps keep the project on track and ensures that expectations laid out at the beginning of the project are being met.
  5. Communicate, communicate, communicate. Although it can be time-consuming, engaging in a continuous dialogue with your software partner is the best way to ensure that your organization's needs are being met and that everyone involved in the project is on the same page.

All too often, an organization's overarching technology strategy and best practices like those outlined above are considered after an organization has invested in a bunch of different solutions, making it harder to course correct when it becomes apparent that the technologies in question don't connect or integrate with each other.

If your organization is just starting out, focus on the core technologies it needs to be effective and operate efficiently (ideally choosing from the solutions listed above). And when you're ready to build out your technology platform, be sure to reference your organization's overarching technology strategy, which should be updated every two or three years (the world is moving fast!).

Annie_rhodes_for_PhilanTopicGood luck!

Annie Rhodes is director of foundation strategy for Blackbaud Foundation Solutions. Follow Annie on Twitter at @AnnieMRhodes.

Weekend Link Roundup (October 14-15, 2017)

October 15, 2017

California-fire-story7-gty-ml-171012_4x3_992Our weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

Arts and Culture

We've always admired Herb Alpert — chart-topping musician, innovative record producer/executive, generous philanthropist — and are happy to pass on the news that his foundation has a brand brand new website.

Economy

"[F]or the first time since World War II, American children have only a 50-50 chance of earning more than their parents" — proof that our "economic system is broken," and why jobs and opportunity are America's most pressing challenge, writes Rockefeller Foundation president Rajiv J. Shah.

Giving

How might tax reform affect charitable giving? On the NPR site, Jonathan Meer, a professor at Texas A&M University and an expert on charitable giving, shares his analysis.

Cash-strapped though they may be, cause-driven millennials are finding ways to support causes and organizations aligned with their passions and concerns. Justin Miller, co-Founder and CEO of CARE for AIDS, a faith-based NGO that provides holistic care to families affected by HIV/AIDS in East Africa, explains.

Grantmaking

On the Center for Effective Philanthropy blog, Anthony Richardson, a program officer at the Nord Family Foundation in Ohio, argues that it is critically important for funders "to listen and be discerning about what may be most helpful — and what may indeed be unintentionally harmful — to organizations doing challenging work on the front lines."

Gun Violence

On The Slot blog, Prachi Gupta argues that the recent mass shooting in Las Vegas distracts us from the real issues around gun violence in America: most of it is clustered in areas with high levels of poverty, low levels of education, and high rates of unemployment. “The places where our murder rates are the highest are places where there is intense poverty, and where the police are just not solving murders.”

Health

Given the increasingly polarized nature of the debate, is there a way forward on healthcare reform? And if there is, what might it look like? In a post on the California Healthcare Foundation blog, Sandra R. Hernández, the foundation's president/CEO, shares some thoughts.

Philanthropy

Education Week blogger reflects on all-too-common "arrogance" of deep-pocketed philanthropists with an abiding interest in education reform and the lessons to be learned from The Prize: Who's in Charge of America's Schools? — journalist's Dale Russakoff's "edgy, hugely readable take on Mark Zuckerberg's $100 million gift to Newark and the messy, controversial reforms that followed."

In a post on the foundation's blog, Barr Foundation co-founder Barbara Hostetter reflects on how much has changed since she and her husband established the foundation twenty years ago and sheds some light on "four important decisions [we've] made about governance and the rationale behind those decisions."

In a new post on the foundation's blog, Heinz Endowments president Grant Oliphant reminds us that a healthy, functioning, helping society "rests on attitudes of love, trust and shared responsibility, without which there will be no helpers left to save us, be it from disaster or from ourselves."

Slowly but surely, impact investing is gaining traction. On the Wealth Management site, Amy Bennett shares fives trends in the space that financial advisors — and the rest of us — should have on their radar.

Here on PhilanTopic, Matt Sinclair has five questions for Rye Young, executive director of theThird Wave Fund, the importance of "representation" — the notion that organizations representing vulnerable communities should be led by members of those communities — and what nonprofits and foundations can do to boost representation within their organizations and in the sector more generally.

Social Enterpreneurship

In his latest post, Nonprofit Chronicles blogger offers an unvarnished profile of media darling and nonprofit superstar Leila Janah, founder and CEO of Samasource and LXMI, social enterprises that provide work to poor people in Kenya, Uganda, Haiti and India.

Social Media

The once-bright promise of social media has faded, thanks in part to the role it has played in coordinated misinformation campaigns, the inability of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and others to ban racist, anti-Semitic and misogynistic trolls from their platforms, and mounting evidence that social media is dangerously addictive. On her blog, Beth Kanter has a good roundup of links to articles that detail the threat and resources for funders and nonprofits eager to fight misinformation and fake news and the negative impact it may be having on their work.

And in the Washington Post, eBay founder and philanthropist Pierre Omidyar looks at six ways social media has become a threat to democracy.

(Photo credit: Justin Sullivan | Getty Images)

That's it for this week. Got something you'd like to share? Drop us a line at mfn@foundationcenter.org.

5 Questions for...Rye Young, Executive Director, Third Wave Fund

October 12, 2017

The Third Wave Fund, an activist fund led by and for women of color and intersex, queer, and trans people under the age of 35, recently launched a pilot effort, the Our Own Power fund, aimed at fostering grassroots organizations in the gender and reproductive justice fields. Rye Young, a trans-activist and executive director of the fund, spoke with PND via email about the importance of representation — the notion that organizations representing vulnerable communities should be led by members of those communities and what nonprofits and foundations can do to boost representation within their organizations and in the sector more generally.

Philanthropy News Digest: What can nonprofits and foundations do to increase self-representation within their organizations?

Rye YoungRye Young: An important first step that many organizations skip is to acknowledge that there is a representation problem in the first place, and to appreciate that this problem does not have an easy fix because it is the result of many factors. There needs to be a conscious effort made to understand how this lack of representation came to be and why it hasn’t been addressed.

Once that understanding has been established, real conversations need to take place focused on why self-representation should be an organizational goal and to determine how far the organization’s leaders are willing to go. For instance, how much funding should be allocated to training? Are those in leadership positions who come from outside the community served by the organization willing to step down from their roles? Can job qualifications be changed or replaced with something more appropriate?

When deciding what steps it can and should take, the organization also must acknowledge the legitimacy of the problem and the many factors behind it. The root causes behind the lack of representation are varied, layered, and deeply embedded within most organizations. So, any decisions arrived at to address the problem must be long-term, and there must be buy-in at all levels of the organization.

PND: Can you give us an example of the kinds of things that result in a lack of representation?

RY: Racism, patriarchy, ageism, ableism — all can result in staff and board members not being members of the community being served, and in turn that can lead to a culture, a set of norms, practices, and values that are reflective of a more privileged or dominant group. And addressing the issue should go beyond changes in leadership or a few key staff; it has to involve a deep examination the organization’s work at every level, from mission and values, to its theory of change, to programs and its human resources policies.

Another example of a root cause could be that your field requires certain types of specialized education, eliminating many eminently qualified candidates and resulting in a small, privileged pool of “qualified” applicants. But there are many drivers. What’s important is that we all do some deep thinking and learning as to what exactly is going on at our own institutions.

PND: Cultural changes like the one you’re suggesting typically take decades to be embraced by a majority. Can the process be accelerated? And should it be?

RY: It’s our opinion that what’s more important than being fast is being intentional and honest about what the problem is, the steps organizations are willing to take to address it, and the end goals. Sometimes, being patient actually can serve a change as deep and inclusive as the one we’re talking about. A change in who is leading the organization’s work shouldn’t be done hastily and without adequate preparation. In fact, all too often, in a change like this, folks from the community being served are thrown into leadership positions during challenging financial times and with very little preparation, training, or external support; essentially, they are set up to fail. But what definitely can help ensure the success of these transitions is for funders to rally around this type of change and support organizational plans that go deeper than just who serves as executive director or in a key leadership role.

PND: Not all forms of diversity are obvious. What can nonprofits do to ensure that their leadership and staff are reflective of diversity in all its manifestations?

RY: It is true that “diversity” programs tend to focus on the representation of identities that are not hidden. And there are many types of discrimination and representation gaps that tend not to be addressed because they are “invisible,” including class, gender identity, immigration status, and so on. On top of that, many organizations assume they know how staff mirror the many different aspects of diversity. But they miss a lot. One thing organizations can do to address that problem is to use anonymous surveys to learn what gaps exist in the organization, do an audit of their physical environments, and get feedback on the organizational culture to see whether there are barriers to inclusion they haven’t thought of. Groups also can use targeted outreach strategies to spread the word to the communities they serve when positions on staff open up.

PND: What is the Our Own Power Fund doing to ensure that young women, especially women of color and from the LGBT community, help inform the decisions affecting those communities?

RY: The Own Our Power Fund is answering the call from our grantee partners to trust young women of color and queer and trans youth to lead the work that impacts them. The fund also is working to address many of the things our grantees have identified that make it challenging for them to lead their nonprofits. The fund acknowledges that although many professionals in philanthropy truly believe in the value of centering the leadership of those affected by systemic prejudice and oppression, it is not unusual for funders to shy away from organizations that are controversial or too outspoken and to not support leaders who belong to the communities being served, or to grant them very little margin for error.

We hope to do it differently. We want to invest in gender justice organizations so that they can set the terms of their work and, to that end, will award one- and two-year capacity-building grants that help support organizations as they undergo a leadership transition or to provide coaching, skills-building training, or other types of professional development training for new leaders. We want to help them develop sustainable revenue models and, at the same time, foster self-representation more broadly by harnessing the power of vulnerable communities to tell their own stories.

Matt Sinclair

Funding Disability Arts

October 09, 2017

The following post is part of a year-long series ;here on PhilanTopic that addresses major themes related to the center's work: the use of data to understand and address important issues and challenges; the benefits of foundation transparency for donors, nonprofits/NGOs, and the broader public; the emergence of private philanthropy globally; the role of storytelling in conveying the critical work of philanthropy; and what it means, and looks like, to be an effective, high-functioning foundation, nonprofit, or changemaker in the twenty-first century. As always, we welcome your thoughts and feedback.

Fudning for disability artsThe stage has been set for a new and vibrant era of funding for disabled artists and disability arts. A spate of innovative programs — Dance/NYC’s Disability. Dance. Artistry. Fund, Alliance for Artist Communities’ Creative Access Fellowship Program, and the Apothetae and Lark Playwriting Fellowship, among others — are putting new dollars into art made by and with disabled people and raising the bar for the broader philanthropic sector.

With CreateNYC, released this summer, the City of New York established the first cultural plan in the United States with disability-specific strategies for expanding cultural access, including a new fund for disabled artists, cultural workers, and audiences. In this and other ways, the city is modeling the kind of leadership that is urgently needed at all levels of government.

Because they embrace disability as a positive artistic and generative force, these efforts are already generating value. They also represent a shift in arts philanthropy, where the exclusion of disabled people is entrenched and where niche disability-specific funds largely have been limited to facility improvements or programs focused on the therapeutic and educational benefits of the arts. And they are demonstrating how, by funding the field of disability arts and its workforce, philanthropy can move the whole creative sector forward — and, by extension, drive social change.

The moment is rife with opportunity. On the one hand, there are opportunities for more expansive disability-specific funds. Indeed, a new generation of disability arts organizations and fiscally sponsored projects is primed for capacity-building investments, and there are critical gaps in funding for disabled artists along the artistic development continuum, from public school classrooms to professional studios and stages.

At the same time, it is incumbent on philanthropy to develop intersectional strategies that consider disability within and across arts funding portfolios rather than in isolation. While philanthropy has made some important strides in its commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice in the arts, more explicit and holistic work needs to be done to address disability.

Money matters, but success in funding disability arts depends on more than money. It requires that funders think and work in new ways, including training their decision-makers in disability aesthetics and disability rights; improving their facilities and communications to ensure equitable access for disabled applicants and grantees; and overhauling their data-gathering practices to better understand inequities in funding and track progress over time.

To effectively expand the pie of financial resources and drive shared goal setting, learning, and accountability, collaboration at multiple levels also is needed. This includes collaboration involving public and private arts funders organized by creative discipline, topic, and geography — local, regional, national, and international.

Second, funders traditionally focused on the arts and funders focused on disability matters need to focus on opportunities to work together and define and achieve common objectives.

Third, and crucially, it is time for philanthropy to adopt the disability rights concept of “nothing without us” — ensuring that no practice be established without the direct involvement of the affected group. This includes efforts to diversify boards, staff, and grant review panels to correct for gaps in disability representation and leadership, as well as a greater focus on relationship building with service groups like the new Disability/Arts/NYC Task Force, which helped shape New York City’s new cultural plan.

Finally, there is a critical role for funder affinity organizations such as Philanthropy New York and national organizations like Grantmakers in the Arts, which can do more to move the needle with respect to funding by demonstrating best practices to their members, cultivating partnerships, and delivering relevant field advocacy, research, communications, training, and convening.

As a proud ally to disabled artists, I call on funders to join the movement to advance disability arts.

Lane Harwell

(Photo credit: Merry Lynn Morris)

Lane Harwell, executive director of arts service organization Dance/NYC, where he administers the Disability. Dance. Artistry. Fund. The fund, which was established with leadership support from the Ford Foundation and additional support from the Mertz Gilmore Foundation, builds on recommendations from Dance/NYC research and convenings. For more posts in the FC Insight series, click here.

Weekend Link Roundup (October 7-8, 2017)

October 08, 2017

Tom-pettyOur weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

Disaster Relief

ProPublica, no fan of the Red Cross, sent a team of reporters to Texas to see how the organization performed in the days after Hurricane Harvey swamped Houston and the surrounding region. They found a lot of local officials who were not impressed. And here's the official Red Cross response to the criticism.

Giving

In the Baltimore Sun, Aaron Dorfman, president of the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, wonders whether elimination of the estate tax, as the Trump administration has proposed, will result in a decline in charitable giving, especially large gifts. That's what happened the last time the tax was effectively zeroed out, in 2010, a year that saw bequests from estates decline by 37 percent from the previous year ($11.9 billion to $7.49 billion). A year later, after the tax had been reinstated (albeit at a lower level), the dollar value of bequests rose some 92 percent (to $14.36 billion). And in an op-ed in the Argus Leader, Dorfman provides some numbers which suggest that the family farm argument for eliminating the tax is overstated.

Inequality

On the Washington Post's Wonkblog, Tracy Jan shares a set of charts from the Urban Institute that help explain why the wealth gap between white families and everyone else is widenening.

International Affairs/Development

In a welcome development, the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, a coalition of disarmament activists, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. Rick Gladstone reports for the New York Times.

Philanthropy

"Social justice organizations in the U.S. and around the world are playing a very long game," writes Kathy Reich, director of the Building Institutions and Networks (BUILD) program at the Ford Foundation. But the way the nonprofit sector is currently financed, she adds, "doesn’t make the fight against inequality any easier." Reich shares five practices outlined in Scaling Solutions Toward Shifting Systems, a report published by Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, that, in her judgment, "are key to powering nonprofit innovation and enabling organizations to scale to solve the world’s pressing social and environmental challenges."

In a post on the Forbes site, Michael Etzel, a partner at Bridgespan, and Hilary Pennington, vice president for for Education, Creativity, and Free Expression at the Ford Foundation, introduce something called the Grantmaking Pyramid, a "philanthropic framework [that] rests on a wide base of foundational capabilities, rises through organizational resilience, and is capped by increasing impact."

Be sure to check out the five-part No Moat Philanthropy series featured on our sister Transparency Talk/Glasspockets blog on consecutive days last week. Penned by Jennifer Reedy, president of the St. Paul-based Bush Foundation, the series looks at the strategies and tactics Reedy and her colleagues have adopted to "open up" the foundation's grantmaking. The posts can be read in any order, but we suggest starting with the first one ("No Moat Philanthropy Part 1: Opening Up") and proceeding in the order in which they appeared: "Bringing the Outside In," "Building Your Network," "Beyond the Transactional," and "The Downsides & Why It's Worth It."

Did you know a new website called GrantAdvisor allows "grant applicants, grantees, and others to share their first-hand experiences working with funders through authentic, real-time reviews and comments"? An initiative of the California Association of Nonprofits, the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, and Great Nonprofits, in partnership with the Association of Fundraising Professionals and Social Media for Nonprofits, the site bills itself as a sort of TripAdvisor for grantseekers and looks to be off to a great start. For more info, check out this FAQ.

Poverty

Some much-needed good news: The child poverty rate in America has hit a record low. Annie Lowrey reports for The Atlantic.

You're not alone if you think government and philanthropy could be doing more to reduce poverty. So does Warren Buffett.

Women and Girls

And Michelle Milford Morse,  a senior advisor to the United Nations Foundation and currently its acting vice president for girls and women strategy, checks in with a week's worth of highlights from the 72nd United Nations General Assembly, which was focused on gender equality and women's rights and empowerment.

(Photo credit: Eric Gruneisen)

That's it for this week. Got something you'd like to share? Drop us a line at mfn@foundationcenter.org.

The Secret to Motivating Donors

October 04, 2017

ActNowbuttonWith year-end fundraising season fast approaching, it's easy for development professionals to fall into the trap of focusing on a single project for which their organization really needs funding. Other nonprofit leaders are frantically crafting year-end appeals, checking and re-checking their donor lists, and trying to come up with creative new ways to engage donors.

No surprise, then, that this is the time of year when we're approached by nonprofits who want to know how they can develop a strategy for new donor acquisition and turn their one-time donors into loyal supporters.

The secret, we tell them, lies in connecting donors to the specific and general — in the same appeal.

Let me give you an example. Assume your organization is working to address a really big problem — say, eliminating hunger in the United States. Such a goal, and the language used to articulate it, can be hard for people to process. In our years of testing fundraising appeals, we've found that potential supporters often don’t understand or respond to messages asking them to support such an ambitious goal. Why? It's too big. What's the point of making a donation if you don't believe your donation will make a dent in the problem it's meant to address?

For a lot of nonprofits, a not atypical scenario looks like this:

  1. A donor — let's call her Margaret — receives a direct-mail appeal asking her to support Organization X, which is working to eliminate hunger in the United States: "Won't you help us end hunger?"
  2. Because she's a compassionate person, Margaret is a little overwhelmed. She isn't a celebrity activist or a deep-pocketed philanthropist, and she only has a couple of hundred dollars set aside for charitable giving. So many people in America struggle with hunger and food insecurity — how can her small donation possibly help?
  3. Margaret decides not to make a donation because she doesn't think it will make a difference.

Instead, we counsel our clients to tell the story of one individual who has been helped by their organization, in the belief that it's easier for a donor to grasp the specific rather than the general. Here's what that might look like:

  1. Margaret receives a direct-mail appeal asking her to support Organization X, which is working to eliminate hunger in the United States. The appeal tells the story of a woman in Margaret's community who was helped a few months ago by donors like Margaret. "The support of generous donors like you makes it possible for a single mom like Donna to feed her family. Will you help us feed another neighbor in need?"
  2. Being a compassionate person, Margaret is moved. As a mother, she knows how hard it can be to provide for one's family, and she's pleased to think her donation can help others like Donna.
  3. Margaret decides to make to donation to Organization X because she truly believes her support will make a difference for someone else in need.

Problem solved? Well, not quite. Communicating need in terms of a single individual or family and appealing to a donor's empathetic nature is only the first piece of the puzzle.

Donations often are made on impulse, meaning when Margaret read the direct-mail letter, she could relate to Donna's plight and wanted to do what she could to help another person in need. What she likely didn't feel, however, was a deep connection to Organization X. She might not even have been aware of its mission.

So while Margaret made a donation — something that made her feel good and that also supported the work of the organization — there's no guarantee she'll do it again in the future.

If Margaret is to become a loyal supporter who is willing to take regular actions on the organization's behalf, she needs to be convinced it is effecting change in small but tangible ways. She also needs to be told how those small actions build on each other — and the actions of other people like her — to effect change on a much larger scale.

In most cases, the failure to do so starts and ends with the organization. If you and your colleagues don't understand or can't articulate how smaller actions by your supporters lead to bigger change, how do you expect your donors to figure it out? Regardless of the action you'd like individual supporters to take, the key is to show how taking this action serves a greater goal.

Let's go back to our example:

  1. Margaret receives a direct-mail appeal asking her to support Organization X, which is working to eliminate hunger in the United States. The appeal tells the story of a woman in Margaret's community who was helped a few months ago by donors like Margaret. "The support of generous donors like you makes it possible for a single mom like Donna to feed her family. And your support today will bring us one step closer to eliminating hunger in the United States. Will you help us feed another neighbor in need like Donna?"
  2. Margaret is moved. As a mother, she knows how difficult it can be to provide for one's family, and she's pleased to think her donation can help someone else in need.
  3. Margaret decides to make a donation to Organization X because she truly believes her support will make a difference for someone else in need.
  4. A few weeks later, upon receiving a thank-you letter from Organization X, she decides to become a monthly supporter of the organization — knowing that every person it is able to help brings it one step closer to its goal of eliminating hunger.

For someone to feel a sense of ownership in a cause, she needs to believe her actions on its behalf — whether it's signing a petition, sharing a post on social media, or making a donation — will make, when combined with the actions of others, a tangible difference.

Remember: Every time you ask a potential supporter to act on behalf of your organization, it should be in the context of how that action will advance the problem or issue your organization is working to address. Keep that in mind as you gear up for the fundraising season ahead (and all the fundraising seasons to come), and best of luck!

Headshot_derrick_feldmann_2015Derrick Feldmann is the president of Achieve, a research and marketing agency for causes, and the author of Social Movements for Good: How Companies and Causes Create Viral Change, now available from Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

Most Popular PhilanTopic Posts (September 2017)

October 03, 2017

September 2017. A month most of us would like to forget. But while folks in Texas, Louisiana, Florida, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were being pounded by Harvey, Irma, Jose, and Maria, our colleagues here at the Foundation Center were doing yeoman's work tracking the hundreds and millions of dollars (more than $300 million at last count) in corporate, foundation, and individual commitments for relief and recovery efforts. For folks interested interested in doing a deeper dive into who gave what, we posted (and regularly updated) some great tables during the month (see below) — as well as great posts by Michael Seltzer, Surina Khan, Tracey Durning, and Chris Kabel (Kresge Foundation), Amy Kenyon (Ford Foundation), and Sharon Z. Roerty (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation). Check it out...and RIP Tom Petty — our hearts are broken.

What have you read/watched/heard lately that got your attention, made you think, or charged you up? Feel free to share in the comments section below. Or drop us a line at mfn@foundationcenter.org.

5 Questions for...Ebony Frelix, Senior Vice President of Philanthropy and Engagement, Salesforce.org

September 28, 2017

The push to ensure that all students receive the high-quality computer science and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education needed to compete in the twenty-first-century economy has been gaining urgency. This week, global Internet companies, foundations, and wealthy individuals announced commitments totaling $300 million in support of K-12 computer science education, including a pledge of $50 million and a million volunteer hours from customer-relationship management software provider Salesforce. That commitment was on top of grants totaling $12.2 million that Salesforce.org, the company's philanthropic arm, had awarded recently to the San Francisco and Oakland Unified School Districts to enhance computer science and STEM education, which included unrestricted funding of $100,000 each to middle school principals.

Earlier this month PND spoke with Ebony Frelix, senior vice president of philanthropy and engagement at Salesforce.org, about the organization's model of giving back 1 percent of equity, product, and employee time; its focus on equality in education; and the importance of expanding access to computer science education for tomorrow's diverse workforce — especially in a sector in which women and people of color are underrepresented.

Ebony_frelixPhilanthropy News Digest: This is the fifth consecutive year that Salesforce.org has provided financial support to schools in San Francisco and the second year it has done so in Oakland. What results are you seeing thus far in terms of enrollment in computer science courses specifically and overall curriculum quality in general?

Ebony Frelix: We know that computer science in general is essential in today's job market and it's imperative that students gain the technical skills they need to be successful in the future. Our goal is to provide opportunities for underrepresented youth in the communities where we live and work to gain exposure and experience in computer science that will help them become college- and career-ready. Ultimately, we believe this will lead to a more talented, skilled, and diverse workforce.

In the San Francisco Unified School District we've given $7 million this year and $21 million in grants to date. Over five years we've seen the enrollment of girls in middle school computer science classes go from nearly two hundred to more than thirty-eight hundred, and of underrepresented student populations from less than one hundred to more than thirty-eight hundred. What that means is that computer science enrollment now mirrors the San Francisco community, with women and underrepresented groups making up nearly half of the students. We also funded twenty-four hundred hours of math content coaching, and we've cut the percentage of students repeating Algebra I in half, from 51 percent to 23 percent, and we hope to see that number continue to drive down. We've also seen a drop in D and F grades in math classes, from 18 percent to 12.6 percent.

In Oakland, we've given $5.2 million this year and $7.7 million in grants to date. We saw an enrollment of nine hundred OUSD middle school students in computer science classes in the first year alone. That was very encouraging, and what was really neat was that those computer science classes are 45 percent females, 38 percent Latinos, and 29 percent African Americans, again closely aligning to the district as a whole. What's even better is that 80 percent of those students received either an A or a B in computer science.

PND: Through the Principal's Innovation Fund (PIF), this year's awards include grants of $100,000 to middle school principals in San Francisco and Oakland. How are principals using those funds?

EF: We like to think that principals are like the CEOs of their schools; they know best how to address the unique needs of their schools. We often hear from principals that failure is not an option, things like "We can't spend money on things that don't work," "We can't take a chance with the district's money." The PIF allows principals to try things and experiment with what works, and then share those learnings with the district. That way we can avoid potentially making a district-wide faux pas with funding or with a program that may not be successful.

We know also that, with a limited budget, principals haven't been able to modernize their schools to align with a twenty-first-century workplace. So if you go into a classroom, they look like they did decades ago — the teacher at the front of the room, the kids sitting in rows, facing the teacher — and that's preventing students from learning in a collaborative workspace. Principals can use the PIF to redesign the classroom, to create a twenty-first-century environment where students are able to learn at standing desks, couches, or pillows; move tables around; have LCD screens all around them. You don't know where the front of the classroom is versus the back of the classroom, because it's flexible. That's a really good way for students to learn, and it also mirrors the workplace they're going to be entering.

In addition, students continue to enter middle school far below grade level, so teachers are faced with having multiple grade levels within one class and having to provide differentiated instruction. Principals are using the PIF to hire additional staff to teach different levels within a multi-tiered computer science curriculum as well as to teach engineering, animation, and robotics courses. And they can implement online personalized learning programs to address the needs of each student and create lesson plans to bring them up to grade level.

PND: Through the Circle the Schools initiative, a partnership between sf.citi, SFUSD, and the San Francisco Education Fund, Salesforce has "adopted" a total of forty-nine schools around the globe. How does the program work, and what long-term benefits are you hoping to see from the effort?

EF: In 2015, Salesforce partnered with sf.citi and Circle the Schools to adopt twenty schools in San Francisco; since then more than twelve hundred Salesforce employees have dedicated thousands of volunteer hours, and we've now adopted forty-nine schools around the globe. Each school is matched with a Salesforce executive and a team of employees who volunteer for activities throughout the year. We focus on education because we want to provide opportunities for underrepresented youth. By setting them up for success in the classroom, we can help create a more diverse, skilled, and talented workforce.

For example, we have an employee who teaches a weekly computer science class, and they're doing the most amazing projects — a young woman programmed an Altoids can to become a portable charger for a cell phone! Our co-founder, Parker Harris, and his team repainted a basketball court; employees help teachers set up their classrooms to prepare for the school year, or read to a class for an hour to give the teacher time to grade papers or have a conference. Through our partnership with the SF Ed Fund, we try to match volunteers to the schools on all levels so we can really "surround" the school — not only with the PIF but with employees who can help meet the school's unique needs.

The Principal's Innovation Fund and Circle the Schools work really well together. It's not a requirement that a school be "circled," and not all schools supported by PIF are circled by Salesforce employees, but our employees will help out anyone! We've paired the CIO of Salesforce.com with the district's CIO, and he helps mentor and guide the district's infrastructure and technology plan, so they have a very tight collaboration; the IT team goes out to schools and help with any infrastructure needs they have. The principals may use the PIF for whatever they like, but they can also count on Salesforce's volunteer time to augment that.

PND: The lack of racial/ethnic and gender diversity in the tech industry has been an issue for some time. You had a career in the tech industry before moving on to philanthropy — are you beginning to see change in the industry on the diversity front? And what more can and should be done to address the issue?

EF: I definitely see change in terms of awareness — I think we're in the "awareness" phase right now. The lack of diversity in tech is a complex issue that many companies struggle with. At Salesforce we're committed to equality for all — we support equal rights, equal pay, equal opportunities, equal education, and environmental sustainability. We know that students at the local schools where we donate volunteer hours and resources are going to become our future workforce, so we know it's going to pay off in the future, not just for Salesforce, not just for the tech industry, but for society as a whole. That's why we start with education: because we know we need to address the problem at its root, and based on the stats on enrollment in CS classes and increases in math scores, I really am hopeful we'll start to see major gains in future years.

Within our company, we are looking at our hiring practices, recruiting practices, hiring from different types of colleges and universities — in that way, we are deepening our "diversity bench," so to speak, at the corporate level. But diversity is something that we need to address at every single level, not just the "now": we have to make sure we're training up the young people so they're ready to take on these positions in the future.

At Salesforce in 2016 we hired a chief equality officer, Tony Prophet, and other companies are likewise focusing on the issue. It starts with visibility and a willingness to speak openly and honestly about the issue. It's a big opportunity for everyone to think differently about how they look at talent, how they look at people within their organizations — promoting them, building skills in the pipeline that they already have in their organizations.

PND: Salesforce.org's stated mission is to help "spark a worldwide corporate giving revolution" by promoting your parent company's 1-1-1 model — leveraging 1 percent of the corporation's equity, product, and employee time to benefit Salesforce communities. How is it going? And with millennials more interested in corporate social responsibility than perhaps their parents and grandparents were, do you expect the 1-1-1 model and things like the Pledge 1% movement to continue to gain traction?

EF: The 1-1-1 model has been a huge success. Since 1999, Salesforce technology has powered more than thirty-two thousand nonprofits and education institutions; we've provided more than $168 million in grants; and our employees have logged more than 2.3 million hours of volunteer time. For us, it's more than just writing a check: our mission is to help create change in the school districts and in the communities where we live and work.

And when recruiting today's millennials, giving back is even more important. There's a 2016 Deloitte study that found that 60 percent of millennials stated that "a sense of purpose" was part of the reason they chose to work for their current employers. Further, those millennials who frequently participate in workplace volunteering are twice as likely to rate their corporate culture as positive. Today giving back is not just for wealthy families and major corporations. Donating and giving back is as easy ordering a pair of shoes on Amazon, and that's the kind of volunteering and experience that millennials are used to and, quite frankly, everyone in today's corporate culture should be getting used to. It should be easy, and it should be part of who we are and what we do. Just like I couldn't imagine my life without a smartphone, I couldn't imagine my life without purpose or without giving back.

One stat that we're extremely proud of is that more than three thousand companies have taken the pledge to incorporate all the parts of the 1-1-1 model into their business model, and we'd like to encourage all businesses to take a look at Pledge 1%. If you start small like Salesforce did and infuse that into your corporate culture from the beginning, you can get to 2.3 million in volunteer hours; you can get to $168 million.

And it's not about who founded the company or who works there. We're seeing companies of all different types and sizes joining the movement. It's really about that visionary, compassionate mindset, that spirit, that allows you to see that serving the community is actually good for business. It's about banking on your future success and making the commitment to bring others along with you.

— Kyoko Uchida

Once and for All: Lead-Free, Healthy Kids

September 26, 2017

Baby_mother_playing_400x300We want all our children to be safe and happy — that's why we have safeguards in place to protect them. Newborns are taken home from the hospital in car seats, kindergarteners must have all their vaccines to enter school, even playground equipment is closely regulated. Yet, despite these investments in their health and safety, children are still at risk in their own homes. While we are closer than ever to eliminating lead in homes, it's still all too prevalent, seeping into the lives of our children through peeling paint, unfiltered water from unsafe pipes, and other sources.

Even though lead poisoning is entirely preventable, 535,000 children under the age of six in the United States are exposed to the dangerous toxin each year through water, paint, soil, and other sources. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "at least four million households have children living in them that are being exposed to high levels of lead." Lead exposure can lead to learning disabilities, speech delays, attention deficit disorder, reduced motor control and balance, and aggressive behavior. In fact, kids with lead poisoning are seven times as likely to drop out of school than their non-lead-poisoned peers, are six times as likely to become involved in the juvenile justice system, and as adults face increased risks of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, depression, and early mortality.

When the Flint water crisis became international news, it was easy to brush it aside as an anomaly — something that would never happen in your own town. But in 2016 a report by Reuters found three thousand localities across the country where at least 10 percent of children — double the rate of lead poisoning in Flint at the height of the crisis there — had elevated levels of lead in their blood. In some cities, "the rate of elevated [lead] tests over the last decade was 40 to 50 percent." Many of the affected communities are low-income and majority African-American and Latino populations, a sadly unsurprising fact given the stark racial disparities when it comes to addressing lead poisoning. In fact, African-American children are roughly five times more likely and Latino children nearly twice as likely to be poisoned by lead than their white peers.

Continue reading »

Commitments for Mexico Earthquake and Hurricane Maria Relief

September 22, 2017

Following hard on the heels of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, Hurricane Maria has wreaked havoc in Puerto Rico, Dominica, and other Caribbean islands, many already devastated by earlier storms, and continues on its path of destruction. In Mexico City and surrounding areas, a 7.1-magnitude earthquake on September 19 — which followed an earlier quake September 7 — has left dozens of buildings completely collapsed and a death toll of 286 and climbing. Pledges from corporations, foundations, public charities, and individuals for relief and recovery efforts are beginning to come in. Here are the commitments of at least $25,000 tracked by our Foundation Center colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato as of September 22.

For commitments designated for both Harvey and Irma relief, please see our updates to the Harvey relief commitments announced by corporate foundations and corporate giving programs, foundations, public charities, and individuals. For commitments designated specifically for Hurricane Irma relief, see our post here. Please also see Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants.

[We're continuing to update the tables as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates.]

Company-Sponsored Foundations and Corporate Giving Programs

GRANTMAKER TYPE RECIPIENT AMOUNT NOTES
3M Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 For Latin American relief for Hurricane Maria, Mexico earthquake
Abbott Fund and Abbott Laboratories Corporate Giving Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program National Chamber of the Pharmaceutical Industry, Multiple Recipients $2,000,000 For Hurricane Maria relief in Puerto Rico and Caribbean islands and Mexico earthquake relief; includes $500,000 in cash and nutrition products and medicines
Amgen Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Direct Relief, Unknown Recipient(s) $5,050,000 $50,000 to Direct Relief for Mexico earthquake relief; $3 million for urgent relief and $2 million for long-term relief from Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico
Bacardi & Company Limited Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $3,000,000 For communities in Florida, Puerto Rico, the Caribbean, the Bahamas, and Mexico impacted by Hurricanes Irma and Maria and Mexico earthquake
CEMEX, S.A.B. de C.V. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Value of donated building materials; for Mexico earthquake of 9/7/17
Coach Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Direct Relief $66,000 For Hurricane Maria relief in Puerto Rico and Mexico earthquake relief
Delta Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 For Hurricane Maria relief in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands
Diageo PLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For Hurricane Maria relief in the U.S. Virgin Islands
E. & J. Gallo Winery Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 For Hurricane Maria relief in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands
Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $625,000 For Hurricane Maria relief; also medical donations and emergency shipments
EVERTEC, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For Hurricane Maria relief in Puerto Rico
Facebook, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program International Red Cross $1,000,000 Will also waive fees on donations to UNICEF made on its Facebook page for Mexico earthquake relief7
Fundación Metlife México Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Fondo para la Paz $400,000 For earthquake of 9/7/17
Fundación Wal Mart de México Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(S) $2,200,000 For Mexico earthquake relief
Google.org Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(S) $250,000 Employee match for Hurricane Maria relief
Home Depot Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $500,000 For Mexican earthquake relief; also product donations from Home Depot Mexico
Honeywell Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Mexico Secretaría de la Defensa Nacional (SEDENA) $400,000 Value of donated personal protective equipment for Mexico earthquake relief
Humana Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $250,000 Value of airlifted supplies to Puerto Rico for Hurricane Maria relief
JetBlue Airways Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For Puerto Rico for Hurricanes Irma and Maria relief
Kaiser Permanente Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program International Medical Corps, CDC Foundation $2,000,000 $1 million each for first responders for Mexico earthquake relief and public health support following hurricanes in Puerto Rico
Lowe's Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 For Hurricane Maria and Mexico earthquake relief
Major League Baseball Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Habitat for Humanity, Project C.U.R.E., U.S. Fund for UNICEF, Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 For Hurricane Maria relief efforts in Puerto Rico and Mexico earthquake relief
M & T Bank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $300,000 to assist victims of Hurricanes Irma and Maria and the earthquake in Mexico
PepsiCo Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Pan American Development Foundation $2,250,000 For Mexican earthquake relief, including earthquake of 9/7/17; for hurricane relief in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean
Suntory Holdings Limited Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Mexican Red Cross $200,000 For Mexican earthquake relief
United Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipients(s) $50,000 Customer match; for Hurricane Maria relief
UPS Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Mexican Red Cross (earthquake), American Red Cross (Hurricane Maria) $25,000 Value of in-kind donation for Mexico earthquake relief
USANA True Health Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Children's Hunger Fund $50,000 Food, nutrition and other aid for Mexico earthquake relief
Vallarta Supermarkets Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program CENACED $50,000 Customer match; for Mexico earthquake and Hurricane Maria relief
Wal-Mart Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $565,000 For Mexico earthquake relief
Walt Disney Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipient(s) $500,000 For Mexico earthquake relief
Wells Fargo & Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 For Mexico earthquake relief
Western Union Foundation and Western Union Company Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation and Corporate Giving Program Save the Children, Unknown Recipient(s) $55,000 Agent match ($10,000); employee match ($25,000) for Mexico earthquake relief
Total: $28,886,000

 

Table 2: Foundations

David Tepper Charitable Foundation Independent Foundation Feeding America $3,000,000 With Appaloosa LP; to help rebuild critical food distribution networks in Puerto Rico, Florida, and Texas following Hurricanes Maria, Irma, and Harvey
Total: $3,000,000

 

Table 3: Public Charities

Direct Relief International Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 For deployment of emergency medical response personnel and essential medical supplies; for Mexico earthquake of 9/7/17
Knights of Columbus Public Charity International Medical Corps $200,000 $100,000 each for Hurricane Maria relief in Puerto Rico and Mexico earthquake relief
Total: $300,000

 

Table 4: Individuals

Carlos Beltran Individual Fundación Carlos Beltran $1,000,000 For Hurricane Maria relief
Salma Hayek Individual GoFundMe $100,000 For Mexico earthquake relief
Jennifer Lopez Individual Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For Hurricane Maria relief
Ricky Martin Individual Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 YouCaring campaign; for Hurricane Maria relief
Shawn Mendes Individual GoFundMe campaign $100,000 For Mexico earthquake relief
Mark Zuckerberg Individual Mexican Red Cross $1,000,000 For Mexico earthquake relief; also Facebook waiving fees on donations to UNICEF made through Facebook tools
Total: $3,200,000

 

September 25, 2017

The Amgen Foundation, Inc., which had pledged $50,000 for Mexico earthquake relief efforts, announces commitments totaling $5 million for Hurricane Maria relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

Carlos Beltrain announces a $1 million commitment for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

Facebook, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $1 million commitment for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The Kaiser Permanente Corporate Giving Program announces a $1 million commitment for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

Jennifer Lopez announces a $1 million commitment for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

Ricky Martin announces a $100,000 pledge for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

Shawn Mendes announces a $100,000 pledge for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The United Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $50,000 pledge for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

The UPS Corporate Giving Program announces a $50,000 pledge for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The Wells Fargo & Company Contributions Program announces a $250,000 commitment for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

Updated total: $22,445,000


September 27, 2017

The Abbott Fund and Abbott Laboratories Corporate Giving Program announce commitments totaling $2,000,000 for Hurricane Maria/Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The Coach Foundation, Inc. announces a $66,000 pledge for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The Delta Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $250,000 pledge for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

The Diageo PLC Contributions Program announces $1,000,000 commitment for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

The E. & J. Gallo Winery Corporate Giving Program announces a $100,000 pledge for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

The EVERTEC, Inc. Contributions Program announces $1,000,000 commitment for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

Google.org announces a $250,000 pledge for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

The Major League Baseball Corporate Giving Program announces a $1,000,000 commitment for Hurricane Maria/Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The Knights of Columbus announces $200,000 pledge for Hurricane Maria/Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The Lowe's Companies, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $250,000 pledge for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The Major League Baseball Corporate Giving Program announces a $1,000,000 commitment for Hurricane Maria/Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The Suntory Holdings Limited Contributions Program announces a $200,000 commitment for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The USANA True Health Foundation announces a $50,000 pledge for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The Walt Disney Company Contributions Program announces a $500,000 pledge for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

Updated total: $29,461,000


September 28, 2017

The Eli Lilly and Company Foundation announces a $625,000 pledge for Hurricane Maria relief.

The JetBlue Airways Corporation Contributions Program announces a $1 million contribution in airlifted supplies to Puerto Rico for Hurricane Maria relief.

Kaiser Permanente, which had pledged $1 million in support of Mexico earthquake relief, announces a $1 million commitment for hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

The M & T Bank Corporate Giving Program announces a $100,000 pledge for victims of Hurricanes Irma and Maria and the earthquake in Mexico.

The David Tepper Charitable Foundation announces a $3 million commitment for relief efforts in Puerto Rico, Florida, and Texas following Hurricanes Maria, Irma, and Harvey.

Updated total: $35,386,000


SPARCC: Rewriting the Playbook on Equitable Infrastructure Investment

September 21, 2017

Sparcc_for_philantopicThroughout the history of the United States, major public infrastructure investments have spurred economic development and shaped entire regions. From the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825 to the completion of the Interstate highway system in 1992, publicly funded infrastructure has played a critical role in the development of our modern economy.  

Yet the story of major infrastructure investments is hardly all positive: Residents of nearly any city in America can point to a large-scale project that displaced and decimated the wealth and social fabric of communities of color, for example. Interstate 81 destroyed the 15th Ward of Syracuse, New York, while Interstate 75 dismantled Detroit's "Black Bottom" neighborhood, home to thousands of people and three hundred and fifty African American-owned businesses. In New York City, mega-projects like the Cross Bronx Expressway put a physical barrier between low-income communities of color and opportunities to earn better livelihoods.  

Major public infrastructure projects can also have harmful impacts on health and climate by increasing our dependence on fossil fuel consumption, increasing CO2 emissions, exacerbating respiratory illnesses like asthma, and inhibiting people's physical activity. And too often, infrastructure investments in walking and cycling amenities, new transit, improved stormwater drainage, broadband, or parks don't reach the people and neighborhoods that need them most.

Mindful of the high stakes of getting infrastructure right, several leading foundations, working in close collaboration with four national partners, have launched the Strong, Prosperous and Resilient Communities Challenge. SPARCC aims to create opportunities for low-income people and communities of color through strategies that promote equity, better health outcomes, and climate resilience. All three of these goals can be realized by amplifying regional public investments in housing, transit, and other impactful infrastructure so that their benefits can be shared equitably—and by empowering the communities that stand to benefit.  By demonstrating how investments in the built environment can create a path for all of a city's residents to thrive, we aim to rewrite the national playbook for how such projects are designed and implemented in the future.

In this month's edition of the Community Development Investment Review, published by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, we describe how the Robert Wood Johnson, Ford, Kresge, and JPB foundations and the California Endowment — along with our implementing partners, the Low Income Investment Fund, Enterprise Community Partners, the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco — worked together to develop this ambitious six-site, $90 million initiative. Together, we aim to test a different model for development — one that harnesses a major public investment in infrastructure to prioritize the needs of low-income people for healthy, resilient, and connected communities, rather than cutting people off or displacing them. We hope that SPARCC can point the way toward reversing a series of urban policy and programmatic decisions that kept communities of color out of the decision-making process, and resulted in decades of disinvestment in low-income communities across the nation, fueling enormous disparities in health and economic opportunities between zip codes that are often just a few miles apart.

We designed SPARCC to capitalize on catalytic moments, those rare times in the life of a community when it is ripe for action. While a significant infrastructure initiative (like the buildout of a regional transit system) is often that catalyst, new leadership, population shifts, strong public will, policy overhauls — or even efforts to recover from a natural disaster, like Superstorm Sandy — can also attract a significant pool of private and public capital and accelerate opportunity. SPARCC pursues a multiplier effect in that opportune moment — for example, taking advantage of the buildout of transit to prioritize affordable housing development near transit stops, or ensuring that a major investment in greenways or revitalization offers benefits to low income communities, rather than triggering rising rents and displacement.

After a competitive review process, the SPARCC partners selected six places for SPARCC to support over the next three years: Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, Memphis and the San Francisco Bay Area. In that period, each region will be awarded $1 million in direct grant and technical assistance funds to support cross-sector efforts to retool policy and development practice. Collectively, the regions will benefit from an additional $14 million for programmatic support in areas including data systems, policy, and communications. A $70 million pool of investment capital — some from the participating foundations, some leveraged through institutions that finance community development — will also be available for community-based projects.

Kabel_kenyon_roertyRecognizing that SPARCC's ambitious goals will require more than a three-year grant period to achieve, we will support cross-sector leaders and accelerate change so that the six regions are equipped to carry out the vision over the long term — and share their learning with communities across the country. We plan to share our own learnings along the way, and invite the engagement of new partners who are also interested in learning how to leverage systems to achieve health, climate and equity goals.

Public infrastructure dollars can and should do much more to promote equitable, resilient, and healthy communities. Our aspiration is that SPARCC will begin to provide a new roadmap, based on the experience of these six regions, that can inform policy and practice in cities across the U.S.

Read our full article here.

Chris Kabel is deputy director of health at  the Kresge Foundation, Amy Kenyon is a program officer for equitable development at the Ford Foundation, and Sharon Z. Roerty is a senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Commitments for Hurricane Irma Relief

September 20, 2017

In the nearly two weeks after Hurricane Irma devastated wide swaths of the Caribbean and Florida, corporations, foundations, and public charities have pledged support for relief and recovery efforts. Here are the commitments of at least $25,000 tracked by our Foundation Center colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato as of September 20.

For commitments designated for both Harvey and Irma relief, please see our updates to the Harvey relief commitments announced by corporate foundations and corporate giving programs, foundations, public charities, and individuals. See also Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants. We're also posting commitments designated for Hurricane Maria and the Mexico City earthquake.

[We're continuing to update the tables as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates.]

Table 1: Company-Sponsored Foundations, Corporate Giving Programs

Grantmaker Type Recipient Amount Notes
Abbvie Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 Also employee match
Allergan Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $150,000 $100,000 to American Red Cross for relief efforts in Florida; $50,000 for relief efforts in Caribbean
American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program MusiCares $25,000
Amgen Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Direct Relief, American Kidney Fund $100,000 Also employee match
Amway Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Employee match
Anthem Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Americares $75,000 Also employee match
AT&T Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Team Rubicon, Telecoms Sans Frontieres, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,400,000 $1,000,000 to Team Rubicon; $150,000 to Telecoms Sans Frontieres
Bank of America Charitable Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,250,000 $1,000,000 to be allocated when an assessment is completed
BankUnited, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 For impacted areas of Florida
BB&T Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 Includes $250,000 in donated supplies
BBVA Compass Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $825,000 $75,000 for employee match
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For relief and recovery efforts in Florida
Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000
Charter Communications, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Rebuilding Together $1,350,000 Includes $1,000,000 in donated public service announcements
Charter Communications, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Rebuilding Together $1,350,000 Includes $1,000,000 in donated public service announcements
Chevron Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program DonorsChoose.org $400,000 For local public school classroom projects in south Florida
Chevron Global Fund Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $600,000 Also employee match
Citi Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000
Coach Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Direct Relief $33,000
Coca-Cola Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 Immediate relief and long-term rebuilding
CUNA Mutual Group Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation CUAid $50,000 For affected credit union partners and employees
CVS Health Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Florida Disaster Fund, CVS Health Employee Relief Fund $75,000
Duke Energy Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Volunteer Florida Foundation – Florida Disaster Fund, United Way, Energy Neighbor Fund, local community agencies $1,000,000
eBay Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 For impacted areas of Gulf Coast
Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $250,000 Also product donations from company
Enterprise Holdings Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Americares $1,000,000 $750,000 to American Red Cross; $250,000 to Americares
EVERTEC, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program United for Puerto Rico – Together Changing Trajectories, Unknown Recipients $150,000 For relief efforts in Puerto Rico; $50,000 for social media match
FedEx Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and value of transportation support
Fifth Third Bank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000 $250,000 for employee match
Ford Motor Company Fund Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $150,000 Employee match.
Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 For relief and recovery efforts in Florida and the Caribbean. Also employee match
Google.org Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,250,000 For impacted areas in southeastern United States and Caribbean; $250,000 for employee match
Humana Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee match
IBM Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 Shelter and call center management. Also donations of Cloud and consulting, and technologies for large-scale volunteer management for Government and NGO partners
JPMorgan Chase & Co. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 For impacted areas in United States and Caribbean
Kohl's Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee volunteerism
Lowe's Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and in-kind donations. Also customer donations
MAXIMUS Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Volunteer Florida $100,000
McKesson Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Americares $185,000 Value of donated product
Mckesson Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $125,000 Employee match
Merck & Co., Inc. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Hand in Hand Hurricane Relief Fund, Multiple Recipients 1,250,000 Also product donations
Microsoft Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $750,000 Also donation of tech services
New York Life Insurance Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Save the Children, Feeding America, UNICEF, NYLIC Family Disaster Assistance Fund $450,000 Also employee match; $100,000 for impacted agents and employees
NextEra Energy Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Florida Disaster Fund $1,000,000 Also employee match
Norfolk Southern Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Feeding Tampa Bay, Feeding South Florida $100,000
Paypal Holdings, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Save the Children $200,000 Also customer donations
PepsiCo Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Feeding America, American Red Cross $1,750,000 For assistance in Florida and the Southeast U.S., Mexico, Caribbean
Prudential Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $500,000 Also employee match
Royal Bank of Canada Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $300,000 For relief and recovery efforts in Florida and the Caribbean
Scotiabank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Canadian Red Cross $500,000 $250,000 for relief and recovery efforts in the Caribbean; young people in affected communities
Sealed Air Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program World Food Program USA, American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity $225,000 $100,000 each for emergency aid for the Caribbean and mainland U.S.; $25,000 for employee match; also product donations
StorageMart Partners, L.P. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program GlobalGiving $25,000 Employee match
SunTrust Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 $250,000 to American Red Cross
Target Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity, Save the Children, UNICEF, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and in-kind donations
United Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $50,000 Customer match
UnitedHealth Group Incorporated Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For impacted Florida communities. Also employee match
UPS Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For recovery efforts in the Caribbean, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. Includes cash grants, in-kind transportation movements and technical expertise
Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Employee match.
Verizon Communications Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hand in Hand $2,500,000
VS Health Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Value of donated water
Walgreens Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 For relief efforts in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. Also donating food and water.
Wal-Mart Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $10,000,000 Customer match
Walt Disney Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients 2,500,000 For Florida, the Caribbean, and other impacted areas
Wells Fargo & Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,100,000 $500,000 to American Red Cross; $100,000 for relief and recovery efforts in the Caribbean
Xerox Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $75,000 $75,000 for employee match
Total: $50,243,000

 

Table 2: Foundations

Charles and Margery Barancik Foundation, Inc. Independent Foundation All Faiths Food Bank, Pines of Sarasota Foundation $374,000 $172,000 for two weeks of food; $202,000 for air conditioning
Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, Inc. Independent Foundation Senior Resources Alliance, Feeding South Florida, Feeding Northeast Florida, Goodman Jewish Family Services of Broward County, Jewish Community Services of South Florida $500,000 For the immediate needs of older adults in areas most affected; for emergency food, water, supplies, and repairs throughout Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade, and Monroe counties; for crisis case management, including counseling and financial assistance to low-income older adults for home repairs and other needs related to the hurricane
Total: $874,000

 

Table 3: Public Charities

American Kidney Fund, Inc. Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $120,000 Emergency disaster relief assistance to 500 dialysis patients
Laura Bush Foundation for America's Libraries Public Charity Unknown Recipient $500,000 For rebuilding school libraries that have been damaged during this year's hurricane season
Our Family Foundation, Inc. Public Charity American Red Cross $250,000 For hardest hit areas in Florida
PetSmart Charities, Inc. Public Charity Miami-Dade Animal Services, Atlanta Humane Society, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,115,000 For animal welfare organizations. Also product donations
Total: $1,985,000


September 22, 2017

The CUNA Mutual Group Foundation announces a $50,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

The MAXIMUS Foundation, Inc. announces a $100,000 commitment for Irma relief efforts.

The New York Life Insurance Company Contributions Program announces a $450,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

The Norfolk Southern Foundation announces a $100,000 commitment for Irma relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $50,194,000


September 25, 2017

The United Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $150,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

The BBVA Compass Corporate Giving Program announces a $825,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $51,069,000


September 27, 2017

The Coach Foundation, Inc. announces a $33,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

The Laura Bush Foundation for America's Libraries announces a $500,000 commitment for Irma relief efforts.

The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation announces a $500,000 commitment for Irma relief efforts.

Updated total: $52,102,000


September 28, 2017

The Duke Energy Foundation announces a $1 million commitment for Irma relief efforts.

Updated total: $53,102,000


Disrupting the Traditional K-12 Model

September 19, 2017

Computer_classI remember my fourth grade classroom outside Seattle: rows of plastic desks with uncomfortable chairs that inevitably had old bubble gum stuck to the bottom. My teacher sat at a larger wooden desk in front of a large chalkboard, every inch of which was often covered. I remember hurrying to copy all those math equations and English homework questions into my notebook before they were all erased.

You will not be surprised to hear that my kids' teachers rarely use chalk. Students today will never take notes on paper or have to remember what had been on a long-erased chalkboard. These changes have affected not only the way teachers teach and the way students learn, but also the way classrooms and teaching tools can be designed to optimize teacher effectiveness and student ability.

I've noticed two tremendous opportunities in the disruption of the traditional K-12 model — trends that are helping educators reimagine the classroom and how they teach, and reshaping the student learning experience. The first is the imperative to democratize digital skills; the second is the increasing potential of personalized learning and approaches that put students at the center of education.

Continue reading »

Keeping the Dream Alive: The Case for Faster Funding

September 13, 2017

DACA_protestThis is a difficult time for our country. The forces of hate and bigotry have emerged from the shadows. White supremacists are marching through the streets proudly waving swastika-adorned flags. And Donald Trump has validated them by throwing more than 800,000 immigrant Dreamers under the bus, revoking their immigration status in a callous act that could have repercussions for years to come.

The hard truth is that, in this moment, funders have to rethink "business as usual" to meet the needs of the moment: with the world aghast at the prospect of 800,000 hardworking Dreamers being deported, and with a White House tacitly endorsing white supremacy, we have to rally behind and expand the fight for justice. Now.

That means identifying innovative mobilization efforts, funding them fast, and taking our cues from the communities we are trying to empower.

Right after Election Day, the Women Donors Network worked in partnership with Solidaire Network and other funders to launch the Emergent Fund, a new kind of fund that was designed to be nimble, responsive, and led (at all levels) by people who are the most marginalized. With quick-turnaround grants of up to $50,000, the fund made it possible for new organizations springing up in response to Trump's policies, as well as those that have been organizing their communities for years, to quickly mobilize, train, and act for social justice.

Here is what we learned from that effort:

Continue reading »

Harvey Relief: Individual Pledges/Commitments (Table 1.4)

September 09, 2017

Biblical. That's the word that best describes the rainfall visited on Houston and southeastern Texas by Harvey, the Category 4 hurricane that slammed into Texas on August 25. The storm meandered over the region for four days, dumping up to forty inches of rain in many places and over fifty in some, becoming the wettest tropical storm ever to hit the contiguous United States.

The catastrophic flooding that followed displaced nearly 40,000 people, prompted more than 17,000 rescues, and damaged over 200,000 homes (of which 12,700 were destroyed). The storm also caused at least 70 deaths and as much as $180 billion in damage, making it one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history.

Support for relief and recovery efforts began to pour in within forty-eight hours and continued at an impressive clip for the next ten days. Here at the Foundation Center, our colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato have been tracking the corporate response, and thanks to their efforts, we're able to provide some good detail on more than $28 million from celebrities, sports figures, and wealthy individuals (see Table 1.4 below). We've also tracked nearly $189 million in corporate pledges/commitments of cash and product donations (Table 1.1), more than $58 million in foundation contributions (including $10 million from the United Arab Emirates) (Table 1.2), and over $9 million in public charity pledges/commitments (Table 1.3) — for a total, as of September 9, of almost $285 million ($284,911,000) pledged or committed to Harvey relief and recovery by private individuals and the private sector. Impressive.

We realize we haven't captured every dollar committed to relief and recovery efforts — and are aware that a lot of individual contributions have flowed into J.J. Watt's Houston Flood Relief Fund that may not be represented in our tables — but we do think this is as comprehensive accounting as you're likely to find. We encourage you to send us additional information as you encounter it and/or corrections to the information posted below. You can email that info (and any questions you might have) to Mitch at mfn@foundationcenter.org.)

As we're posting this, powerful Hurricane Irma, which has already flattened Barbuda and caused serious damage to Antigua, St. Martin/St. Maarten, and parts of the British Virgin Islands, has the Florida Keys and south Florida in its sights. Our thoughts are with everyone in the region who was not able to evacuate (or chose to ride the storm out in place). We'll be back on Monday with updates as the damage reports start to roll in.

[We're continuing to update the table as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates; see also Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants. We're also posting commitments designated specifically for Hurricane Irma relief and for Hurricane Maria and the Mexico City earthquake].

Table 1.1 (Corp.) | Table 1.2 (Fdns) | Table 1.3 (PCs) | Table 1.4 (Inds)

Table 1.4: Individuals

Grantmaker Type Recipient Amount Notes
Leslie Alexander NBA owner Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $4,000,000  
Odell Beckham, Jr.  Pro football player Americares, Samaritan's Purse $100,000  
Chris Brown Musician American Red Cross $100,000  
Sandra Bullock Actor American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Charles Butt Businessman Houston Flood Relief Fund $5,000,000  
Jim Crane (Houston Astros) Businessman Houston Flood Relief Fund $4,000,000  
Ellen DeGeneres, Ellen DeGeneres Show Entertainer American Red Cross, SPCA Texas, Unknown Recipient(s) $75,000 American Red Cross ($25,000), SPCA Texas ($25,000)
Jimmy Fallon, The Tonight Show Entertainer Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
James Harden Pro basketball player Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Kevin Hart Actor American Red Cross $25,000  
Kieu Hoang Businessman Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $5,000,000  
Huntsman Family Business Beaumont Foundation $1,000,000 To launch Huntsman Flood Fund
Kardashian-Jenner Family Family Reality TV personalities American Red Cross, Salvation Army $100,000  
DJ Khalid Record producer American Red Cross $25,000  
Kroenke Family American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Nicki Minaj Musician Houston Flood Relief Fund $25,000  
McNair Family (Houston Texans) NFL owner United Way of Greater Houston Relief Fund $2,000,000  
Paul Simon and Edie Brickell Musicians Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000  
Amy Adams Strunk (Tennessee Titans) NFL owner Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Donald Trump POTUS Multiple Recipients $1,000,000  
J.J. Watt Pro football player Houston Flood Relief Fund $100,000  
Chris Young Musician American Red Cross $100,000  
    TOTAL: $33,575,000  

 

September 15, 2017

Businessman Kieu Hoang pledges $5 million to the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund.

Updated individual total: $33,575,000


Harvey Relief: Public Charity Commitments (Table 1.3)

Biblical. That's the word that best describes the rainfall visited on Houston and southeastern Texas by Harvey, the Category 4 hurricane that slammed into Texas on August 25. The storm meandered over the region for four days, dumping up to forty inches of rain in many places and over fifty in some, becoming the wettest tropical storm ever to hit the contiguous United States.

The catastrophic flooding that followed displaced nearly 40,000 people, prompted more than 17,000 rescues, and damaged over 200,000 homes (of which 12,700 were destroyed). The storm also caused at least 70 deaths and as much as $180 billion in damage, making it one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history.

Support for relief and recovery efforts began to pour in within forty-eight hours and continued at an impressive clip for the next ten days. Here at the Foundation Center, our colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato have been tracking the corporate response, and thanks to their efforts, we're able to provide some good detail on more than $9 million in public charity pledges/commitments (see Table 1.3 below). We've also tracked nearly $189 million in corporate pledges/commitments of cash and product donations (Table 1.1), more than $58 million in foundation contributions (including $10 million from the United Arab Emirates) (Table 1.2), and over $43 million from celebrities, sports figures, and wealthy individuals (Table 1.4) — for a total, as of September 9, of almost $3000 million ($299,934,500) pledged or committed to Harvey relief and recovery by private individuals and the private sector. Impressive.

We realize we haven't captured every dollar committed to relief and recovery efforts — and are aware that a lot of individual contributions have flowed into J.J. Watt's Houston Flood Relief Fund that may not be represented in our tables — but we do think this is as comprehensive accounting as you're likely to find. We encourage you to send us additional information as you encounter it and/or corrections to the information posted below. You can email that info (and any questions you might have) to Mitch at mfn@foundationcenter.org.)

As we're posting this, powerful Hurricane Irma, which has already flattened Barbuda and caused serious damage to Antigua, St. Martin/St. Maarten, and parts of the British Virgin Islands, has the Florida Keys and south Florida in its sights. Our thoughts are with everyone in the region who was not able to evacuate (or chose to ride the storm out in place). We'll be back on Monday with updates as the damage reports start to roll in.

[We're continuing to update the table as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates; see also Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants. We're also posting commitments designated specifically for Hurricane Irma relief and for Hurricane Maria and the Mexico City earthquake].

Table 1.1 (Corp.) | Table 1.2 (Fdns) | Table 1.3 (PCs)| Table 1.4 (Inds)

Table 4: Public Charities

Grantmaker Type Recipient Amount Notes
American Jewish Committee Public Charity Multiple Recipients $34,000  
Baptist Health Foundation of San Antonio Public Charity Texas Baptist Men, Salvation Army $100,000  
Barbara Bush Houston Literacy Foundation Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For impacted public libraries, teachers, and students in Houston
CHS Caregivers Fund Public Charity Diocese of Rockville Centre Hurricane Harvey Fund $100,000  
Direct Relief International Public Charity Unknown Recipient $200,000 Also entire current inventories worth $100 million made available
Henry Schein, Inc. Public Charity Multiple Recipients $500,000 Cash, in-kind and employee match
Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo, Inc. Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $2,000,000  
Laura Bush Foundation for America's Libraries Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For rebuilding school libraries that have been damaged during this year's hurricane season
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Up to $1 million in direct support to help blood cancer patients in affected communities
NFL Foundation, Inc. Public Charity United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000 Matching Houston Texans donation
PETCO Foundation Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $2,300,000 All For Saving Lives fund raising campaign in Petco stores and online through September 10
PetSmart Charities, Inc. Public Charity Multiple Recipients $2,000,000 To animal welfare agencies; also pet food and supplies
Scholarship America, Inc. Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $200,000 For college students affected by Harvey
    TOTAL: $11,134,000  

 

September 15, 2017

Scholarship America, Inc. announces a $200,000 donation to unknown recipient(s) in support of college students affected by Harvey.

Updated public charity total: $9,634,000


September 27, 2017

The Barbara Bush Houston Literacy Foundation announces a $1,000,000 donation for impacted public libraries, teachers and students in Houston.

The Laura Bush Foundation for America's Libraries announces a $500,000 donation for rebuilding school libraries.

Updated public charity total: $11,134,000


Harvey Relief: Foundation Pledges/Commitments (Table 1.2)

Biblical. That's the word that best describes the rainfall visited on Houston and southeastern Texas by Harvey, the Category 4 hurricane that slammed into Texas on August 25. The storm meandered over the region for four days, dumping up to forty inches of rain in many places and over fifty in some, becoming the wettest tropical storm ever to hit the contiguous United States.

The catastrophic flooding that followed displaced nearly 40,000 people, prompted more than 17,000 rescues, and damaged over 200,000 homes (of which 12,700 were destroyed). The storm also caused at least 70 deaths and as much as $180 billion in damage, making it one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history.

Support for relief and recovery efforts began to pour in within forty-eight hours and continued at an impressive clip for the next ten days. Here at the Foundation Center, our colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato have been tracking the corporate response, and thanks to their efforts, we're able to provide some good detail on more than $58 million in foundation contributions (including $10 million from the United Arab Emirates) (see Table 1.2 below). We've also tracked nearly $189 million in corporate pledges/commitments of cash and product donations (Table 1.1), over $9 million from public charities (Table 1.3), and more than $28 million from celebrities, sports figures, and wealthy individuals (Table 1.4) — for a total, as of September 9, of almost $285 million ($284,911,000) pledged or committed to Harvey relief and recovery by private individuals and the private sector. Impressive.

We realize we haven't captured every dollar committed to relief and recovery efforts — and are aware that a lot of individual contributions have flowed into J.J. Watt's Houston Flood Relief Fund that may not be represented in our tables — but we do think this is as comprehensive accounting as you're likely to find. We encourage you to send us additional information as you encounter it and/or corrections to the information posted below. You can email that info (and any questions you might have) to Mitch at mfn@foundationcenter.org.)

As we're posting this, powerful Hurricane Irma, which has already flattened Barbuda and caused serious damage to Antigua, St. Martin/St. Maarten, and parts of the British Virgin Islands, has the Florida Keys and south Florida in its sights. Our thoughts are with everyone in the region who was not able to evacuate (or chose to ride the storm out in place). We'll be back on Monday with updates as the damage reports start to roll in.

[We're continuing to update the table as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates; see also Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants. We're also posting commitments designated specifically for Hurricane Irma relief and for Hurricane Maria and the Mexico City earthquake].

Table 1.1 (Corp.) | Table 1.2 (Fdns) | Table 1.3 (PCs) | Table 1.4 (Inds)

Table 2: Independent, Family, Community Foundations

Grantmaker Type Recipient Amount Notes
Micky and Madeleine Arison Family Foundation Family Foundation Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 To be split evenly among Direct Relief, Houston Food Bank, Operation Homefront, Save the Children, and United Way of Greater Houston
Laura and John Arnold Foundation Family Foundation Greater Houston Community Foundation $5,000,000  
Charles & Margery Barancik Foundation Family Foundation Greater Houston Community Foundation $100,000  
Arthur M. Blank Foundation Family Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 Matching fund for victims of both Harvey and Irma
Bohemian Foundation Independent Foundation NoCo Hurricane Harvey Recovery Fund $2,000,000 1:1 match up to $2 million for donations made by individuals, businesses, and corporate donors in Larimer and Weld County, Colorado
Boston Foundation, Inc. Community Foundation Greater Houston Community Foundation $25,000  
Michael & Susan Dell Foundation Family Foundation Rebuild Texas Fund $36,000,000 To launch Rebuild Texas Fund ($18 million); 1:2 text match campaign (up to $18 million)
Leonardo Di Caprio Foundation Independent Foundation United Way Harvey Recovery Fund $1,000,000  
Conrad N. Hilton Foundation Family Foundation Unknown Recipient $2,000,000  
Houston Endowment Independent Foundation Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $500,000  
Huntsman Foundation Family Foundation Beaumont Foundation $1,000,000 To launch Huntsman Flood Fund
J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation Family Foundation American Red Cross $250,000  
Taube Philanthropies Family Foundation All Hands Volunteers $1,000,000 Jewish community needs ($100,000)
United Arab Emirates Sovereign fund Multiple Recipients $10,000,000 Embassy officials will coordinate with state/local leaders about specific relief and recovery efforts
Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation Family Foundation Houston Food Bank, Jewish Family Services (JFS) of Houston, Mission Continues, Team Rubicon $500,000  
    TOTAL: $61,375,000  

 

September 15, 2017

The Charles & Margery Barancik Foundation announces a $100,000 donation to the Greater Houston Community Foundation Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund.

Updated foundation total: $59,375,000


September 28, 2017

The Houston Endowment announces a $2 million donation to the Greater Houston Community Foundation Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund.

Updated foundation total: $61,375,000


Harvey Relief: Corporate Pledges/Commitments (Table 1.1)

Biblical. That's the word that best describes the rainfall visited on Houston and southeastern Texas by Harvey, the Category 4 hurricane that slammed into Texas on August 25. The storm meandered over the region for four days, dumping up to forty inches of rain in many places and over fifty in some, becoming the wettest tropical storm ever to hit the contiguous United States.

The catastrophic flooding that folloFwed displaced nearly 40,000 people, prompted more than 17,000 rescues, and damaged over 200,000 homes (of which 12,700 were destroyed). The storm also caused at least 70 deaths and as much as $180 billion in damage, making it one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history.

Support for relief and recovery efforts began to pour in within forty-eight hours and continued at an impressive clip for the next ten days. Here at the Foundation Center, our colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato have been tracking the corporate response, and thanks to their efforts, we're able to provide some good detail on nearly $189 million in corporate pledges/commitments of cash and product donations (see Table 1.1 below). We've also tracked more than $58 million in foundation contributions (including $10 million from the United Arab Emirates) (Table 1.2), over $9 million from public charities (Table 1.3), and more than $28 million from celebrities, sports figures, and wealthy individuals (Table 1.4) — for a total, as of September 9, of almost $285 million ($284,911,000) pledged or committed to Harvey relief and recovery by private individuals and the private sector. Impressive.

We realize we haven't captured every dollar committed to relief and recovery efforts — and are aware that a lot of individual contributions have flowed into J.J. Watt's Houston Flood Relief Fund that may not be represented in our tables — but we do think this is as comprehensive accounting as you're likely to find. We encourage you to send us additional information as you encounter it and/or corrections to the information posted below. You can email that info (and any questions you might have) to Mitch at mfn@foundationcenter.org.)

As we're posting this, powerful Hurricane Irma, which has already flattened Barbuda and caused serious damage to Antigua, St. Martin/St. Maarten, and parts of the British Virgin Islands, has the Florida Keys and south Florida in its sights. Our thoughts are with everyone in the region who was not able to evacuate (or chose to ride the storm out in place). We'll be back on Monday with updates as the damage reports start to roll in.

[We're continuing to update the table as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates; see also Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants. We're also posting commitments designated specifically for Hurricane Irma relief and for Hurricane Maria and the Mexico City earthquake].

Table 1.1 (Corp.) | Table 1.2 (Fdns) | Table 1.3 (PCs) | Table 1.4 (Inds)

Table 1: Company-Sponsored Foundations, Corporate Giving Programs

Grantmaker Type Recipient Amount Notes
3M Foundation and 3M Company Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 $250,000 for employee match; $750,000 cash and product support for relief operations in Texas and Louisiana
Aaron's, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $145,000 Employee donations ($45,000)
Abbott Fund, Corporate Giving Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Value of donated healthcare and nutrition products ($100,000
Abbvie Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $1,000,000  
Academy, Ltd. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $2,500,000 Value of unified command center and shelter for first responders
AdvoCare International L.P. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Employee and customer match ($50,000)
Aflac Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000 Employee and customer match ($50,000)
Aetna Foundation Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Greater Houston Community Foundation, Team Rubicon $250,000
Agropur, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $25,000  
Ahold USA (Stop & Shop, Giant Food of Landover, and Giant Food Stores of Carlisle) Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $250,000 Cash ($175,000), in-kind ($75,000)
AkzoNobel, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $250,000 American Red Cross ($50,000), Hurricane Harvey Disaster relief Fund ($50,000), misc. recipient ($50,000), employee match ($100,000) $50,000 to Hurricane Harvey Disaster Relief Fund, $50,000 to miscellaneous recip, $100,000 employee match"
Albertsons Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $200,000 Customer match
Allergan Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Allstate Foundation, Company Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $750,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts; includes employee and agency owners match ($500,000), student match ($250,000)
Altria Group, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program OneStar Foundation (for Rebulid Texas Fund), Unknown Recipient(s) $750,000 $250,000 for employee match
Amazon.com, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,00,000 Customer match
Amegy Bank of Texas Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program United Way Flood Relief Fund $850,000  
Ameren Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Also employee contributions
American Express Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 For immediate disaster relief ($150,00), employee match ($100,000)
American Honda Motor Co., Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match
American International Group (AIG) Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Center for Disaster Philanthropy $1,000,000 Immediate needs ($500,000), medium- and longer-term recovery efforts ($500,000)
AmerisourceBergen Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts
Amgen Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $100,000  
Amway Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, International Red Cross $250,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts, including in Caribbean; also in-kind donations
Anadarko Petroleum Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Andeavor Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, San Antonio Food Bank, Houston Food Bank, Texas Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters, Team Rubicon, Salvation Army, Coastal Bend Community Foundation’s Disaster Recovery Fund, Greater Houston Community Foundation’s Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, One Star Foundation  (Abbott’s Rebuild Texas Fund), Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Employee match ($100,000)
Andersen Corporate Foundation, Corporation Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Houston Habitat for Humanity $175,000 Employee match ($25,000), value of donated windows and doors ($100,000)
Archer Daniels Midland Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 $50,000 for employee match
Associa Cares, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $50,000  
AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Americares $100,000 Also employee match and product donations as needed
Apple Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $5,000,000 Incudes additional $3 million for relief efforts benefiting people affected by Harvey and Irma
Assurant Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Astros Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $4,000,000 Jointly with team owner Jim Crane
AT&T Foundation, Corporate Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program Greater Houston Community Fund, American Red Cross, Coastal Bend Community Foundation, Multiple Recipients $300,000 Employee match ($50,000)
Atlanta Braves Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Programs American Red Cross $25,000  
Atlanta Falcons (NFL)/Atlanta United (MLS) Corporate Giving Programs American Red Cross, United Way, World Vision $1,000,000 To be split by the three organizations
Avangrid Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $50,000  
Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000  
Bank of America Charitable Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Employee match ($750,000)
BASF Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 $500,000 for local nonprofits; $500,000 for employee match
Bayer Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $750,000  
BB&T Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
BBVA Compass Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $750,000
BBVA Compass Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $325,000 $75,000 employee match; will also raise $250,000 in employee and customer contributions
BD Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Americares, TBD $700,000 For victims of Harvey and Irma; $100,000 employee match for Americares; $600,000 in cash and product donations to TBD
Bechtel Group Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $500,000
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Also employee match
BMO Financial Group Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Boehringer Ingelheim Cares Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $125,000 Corporate contributions and employee match. Also product donations
Boeing Company Charitable Trust Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Employee match ($100,000)
BP America Corporate Giving Program Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $750,000 Also employee match through foundation
Bridgestone Americas, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Programs American Red Cross $1,000,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts
Campbell Soup Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Feeding America, Multiple Recipients $160,000 Value of product donations ($85,000), employee match ($25,000)
Camping World, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $2,000,000 Match. Also product donations
Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000  
Canadian National Railway Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Louisiana Red Cross $75,000 $25,000 for employee match
Cargill, Incorporated Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $250,000 Also employee giving via payroll deduction ($150,000), value of 150,000 tons of donated animal feed ($100,000)
CarMax, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match from CarMAx Foundation
Carnival Cruise Line, Carnival Foundation Corporate Giving Program, Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 To be split among Direct Relief, Houston Food Bank, Operation Homefront, Save the Children, and United Way of Greater Houston
Casey's General Stores, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Employee match
Caterpillar Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $300,000  
CEMEX, S.A.B. de C.V. Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000  
CenterPoint Energy Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, United Way of Greater Houston $1,250,000 Includes $250,000 each to the three named recipients
Century Communities Corporate Giving Program Houston Food Bank, Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $500,000 Houston Food Bank ($125,000), Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund ($125,000)
Charter Communications, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Value of donated public service announcements
Cheniere Energy, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Chevron Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee match
Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston $750,000 Employee match ($250,000)
CH2M HILL Companies Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $70,000  
Cigna Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Cincinnati Reds LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $40,000  
Cisco Systems Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $1,000,000 Employee match ($500,000 - up to $10k per employee)
Citi Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000  
CITGO Petroleum Corp. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, Unknown Recipient(s) $5,000,000</a Part of a fund of up to $5 million set aside to provide aid to those affected
Coach Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $200,000 Also employee match
Coca-Cola Foundation and Coca-Cola Company Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Coca-Cola Employee Disaster Relief Fund $1,100,000 For food and shelter and aid in long-term rebuilding efforts; $100,000 for employee match
Comerica Incorporated Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Conn's, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $200,000 Match
ConocoPhillips Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, United Way of Greater Houston $5,000,000 $1.5 million to Red Cross in addition to earlier $1 million gift
Continental Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 Employee donations ($25,000)
Covestro LLC Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee contributions
Crestwood Equity Partners Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross of Greater Houston $125,000 Red Cross of Greater Houston ($100,000), Matagorda County ($25,000)
CUNA Mutual Group Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program CUAid $50,000 For affected employees
Cushman & Wakefield Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 Employee match ($50,000)
CVS Health Foundation, Corporation Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Greater Houston Community Foundation, Salvation Army, Unknown Recipient(s) $175,000 Employee match ($25,000), Value of donated products
Daimler AG Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 On behalf of U.S. subsidiaries
Dallas Cowboys Football Club, Ltd. Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston's Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Dell Inc. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $500,000 Also employee match
DentaQuest Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Michael & Susan Dell Foundation Rebuild Texas Fund $1,000,000  
DENSO North America Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $50,000  
D.G. Yuengling & Son, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 For Harvey/Irma relief
Diageo North America, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $200,000 Cash, supplies, and water
Dick's Sporting Goods Foundation, Dick's Sporting Goods, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program DonorsChoose.org, American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $5,500,000 $1 million for community youth sports leagues, teams, organizations affected by Harvey/Irma; $1 million for up to $25,000 for eligible schools' sports programs; $3.5 million in donated clothing and footwear
Direct Energy, LP Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Employee match
Discover Financial Services Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,500,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts ($1 million); cardmember donation matching program ($500,000)
Dollar General Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 For relief and recovery efforts across Texas and Louisiana
Dollar Tree, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 Affected employees ($250,000)
Dominion Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $75,000  
Dow Chemical Company Foundation, Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Multiple Recipients $1,100,000 Employee match ($100,000)
E. & J. Gallo Winery Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match
eBay Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $250,000 Employee match
Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $250,000 Also employee match and product donations
Entergy Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000 Also employee match
Enterprise Rent-A-Car Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000  
EOG Resources, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For reflief efforts and employee assistance; also employee match
Exelon Corporation Contributions Program, Exelon Foundation Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $350,000  
Exxon Mobil Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $8,500,000 Employee match ($6,000,000), value of In-kind donations ($2,500,000)
Facebook, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program CDP Hurricane Harvey Recovery Fund $1,000,000  
FCA US LLC, FCA Foundation Corporate Giving Program, Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $200,000 Americares ($50,000), First Response Team of America and Team Rubicon ($75,000)
Federal Home Loan Bank of Dallas Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $7,000,000 Grants ($6.7 million), member donations ($275,000)
FedEx Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and value of transportation support to deliver critical medical aid and supplies
FirstEnergy Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $75,000 Employee match ($50,000)
Ford Motor Company Fund Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $150,000 $50,000 for employee match for American Red Cross
Foresters Financial Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000  
Fortis Inc. and ITC Holdings Corp Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Friedkin Group Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Relief Fund $500,000  
Frontier Communications<.strong> Corporate Giving Program Rebuild Texas Fund $1,000,000  
Frost Bank Charitable Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $1,100,000 Match (up to $100,000 for affected employees)
FULLBEAUTY Brands, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Delivering Good $300,000 In-kind
Gap Foundation, Gap, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Includes a cash grant from Gap Foundation, donations from Gap Inc. brands, and employee-matched donations
General Electric Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $500,000 Also employee match
General Mills, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Feeding America, American Red Cross $150,000 Employee match ($50,000)
GM Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Habitat for Humanity $500,000 For both Harvey and Irma relief
GoFundMe Corporate Giving Program Direct Impact Fund $100,000  
Google.org Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,750,000 Google.org and employee contributions
Guy and O'Neill Inc. Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $200,000 In-kind donation of diapers
H. E. Butt Grocery Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 Also customer contributions
HanesBrands Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $2,250,000 In-kind to Delivering Good and Glen Raven Logistics ($2,000,000 ), American Red Cross ($25,000)
Hanmi Bank Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000  
HCA Healthcare Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, HCA Hope Fund $2,000,000  
Hercules Capital, Inc. Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000  
Hess Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $1,000,000 Also employee match
Hilltop Holdings Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 Also employee contributions
Hilton Worldwide Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000  
Home Depot Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Salvation Army, Convoy of Hope, Operation Blessing and Team Rubicon $2,000,000 For short-term relief and rebuilding needs; includes additional commitment of $1 million to support hurricane relief efforts
Honeywell Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $2,000,000  
Houston Texans Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Humana Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $250,000  
Hyundai Motor America Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Multiple Recipients $500,000 $200,000 for five children's hospitals in Texas; $300,000 to American Red Cross for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.
IBM Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $2,000,000 Cash and value of in-kind technology and services
Intel Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $250,000 Employee match
Intercontinental Exchange, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee match
International Paper Company Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Feeding America $1,000,000  
J.C. Penney Company, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Also help to affected J.C. Penney employees from the Golden Rule Relief Fund
Jefferies Group, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Also pledged to donate all net trading commissions from trading on Wednesday, August 30
Johns Manville Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000  
JPMorgan Chase & Co. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients (Red Cross and others) $1,000,000 Also employee match
Kaiser Permanente Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Mental Health America of Greater Houston $1,000,000  
Kansas City Southern Charitable Fund Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $75,000 Employee match ($25,000)
KBR, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program KBR Charitable Foundation Disaster Relief Fund $500,000 For employees affected by Harvey
Kellogg Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Feeding America $100,000  
KeyBank Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Houston Food Bank $100,000  
Kia Motors America, Inc. Contributions Program, Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $300,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts
Kinder Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Kindred Healthcare, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000  
Koch Industries, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Koch Employee Assistance Fund $1,750,000 $500,000 for employee match for Koch Employee Assistance Fund
Kohl's Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $2,000,000 Aid to Kohl's employees ($1,000,000)
Kroger Co Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Houston Food Bank $100,000 For every social share of the #KrogerCares post, the foundation will donate $5 to the food bank, up to $100,000. Also, customer contributions
Kubota Tractor Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and product donations
Lee's Sandwiches Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $100,000  
Lennar Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000 Also employee match
Lexmark International, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 Employee match ($20,000)
Liberty Mutual Group Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match
Lockheed Martin Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $380,000  
Louisiana-Pacific Corporation Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 American Red Cross, Salvation Army, and the United Way of Greater Houston Relief Fund ($500,000), in-kind ($500,000)
Lowe's Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000  
Lundbeck Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, American Epilepsy Society, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Alzheimer’s Association, Parkinson’s Foundation $135,000 Includes $10,000 for employee match; $25,000 each for the five organizations
Lyft, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Greater Houston Community Foundation $100,000 Also customer contributions to Red Cross
LyondellBasell North America Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000  
Lytton Rancheria of California Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $1,000,000  
M&T Bank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Employee match ($100,000)
Macquarie Group Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Macy's Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Major League Baseball Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 Jointly with MLB Players Association
Marriott International, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Also customer donations
MasterCard Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also waiving any interchange related to donations to specific charities
Mattress Firm, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $2,000,000 Value of product, customer donations
Mazda North American Operations Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Together with foundation
McDonald's Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,250,000 Employee match ($250,000)
McKesson Foundation, Corporate Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program Direct Relief, World Vision $250,000 Value of product donations, also employee match ($100,000)
Merck & Co., Corporate Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hand in Hand Hurricane Relief Fund, Multiple Recipients $1,250,000 For Harvey/Irma, also product donations
MetLife Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $250,000 Also employee match
Michael Kors Holdings Ltd. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000  
Microsoft Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
MillerCoors LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Also 50,000 cans of drinking water to Red Cross
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $300,000</a  
Mizuho Financial Group, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Habitat for Humanity $100,000  
Monsanto Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Feeding America $500,000 Also employee match
Motiva Enterprises LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $500,000  
National Hockey League Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity $200,000 Jointly with National Hockey League Players' Association (NHLPA)
Nationwide Insurance Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $500,000  
NBCUniversal, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Value of advertising time ($500,000?)
New England Patriots LP Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 Match
New York Community Bank Corporate Giving Program Team Rubicon $25,000 For hurricane relief efforts in the United States
New York Life Insurance Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Feeding Texas, Save the Children $350,000  
Nexstar Media Group, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Nexstar for Texas $2,500,000  
NextEra Energy, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Employee match ($100,000)
Norbord Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Home Builders Institute $1,000,000 For training and educating new construction professionals to help rebuild after Irma and Harvey
Norfolk Southern Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Food Bank of Houston $100,000  
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,100,000 Includes $1,000,000 in in-kind donations
Novo Nordisk Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Houston Health Foundation $150,000 Also employee match to American Red Cross
NRG Energy, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $2,000,000 Value of in-kind donations and assistance ($1,000,000)
NuStar Energy L.P. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Salvation Army, San Antonio Food Bank $250,000  
Olin Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Also product donations
Oncor Electric Delivery Company, LLC Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
ONEOK Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 For employees in need ($200,000)
Orbital ATK Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $100,000  
Pacific Gas & Electric Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 Employee match
Pacific Life Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match
Panda Cares Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Tzu-Chi Foundation $1,000,000  
Patterson Companies Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $70,000  
PenFed Credit Union Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000  
Pentair Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $25,000 Also employee match
PepsiCo Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also Aquafina purified drinking water from local business units
Pet Supermarket, Pet Valu Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 In-kind
Phillips 66 Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Rebuild Texas Fund, United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $4,000,000
Pioneer Natural Resources Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match
PNC Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $350,000 Employee match ($100,00)
Prudential Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $500,000 Also employee match
Publix Super Markets, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Also employee and customer contributions
Qualcomm Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For long-term recovery ($500,000), employee match ($250,000)
QVC, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $250,000 Customer match ($100,000), employee match ($25,000)
Range Resources Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Red Wing Shoe Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Good360 $500,000 Product donations
Regions Financial Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $100,000  
Renaissance Family Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $25,000  
Reynolds American Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $150,000  
Rite-Aid Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000 Employee match to American Red Cross ($50,000), in-kind ($20,000)
Rooms to Go Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $2,000,000 Also product donations
Ross Stores, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $400,000 Also customer contributions
Royal Bank of Canada Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Samsung Electronics America, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Donated products ($500,000)
Sanofi Foundation for North America Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $225,000 Also employee match to American Red Cross
Santander US Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, American Red Cross $100,000  
Schneider Electric Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Scholastic Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000  
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $150,000 Also price reduction and expedited shipping for products bound for the affected areas
Scotiabank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Zina Garrison Tennis & Education Academy $100,000  
Sealed Air Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $125,000 Employee match ($25,000); also in-kind donations to NGOs
Seattle Mariners Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $150,000
SecureView, LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Sempra Energy Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Americares, Unknown Recipient(s) $200,000  
Shell Oil Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Shiner Beers Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $500,000  
Sinclair Broadcasting Group (and affiliates) Corporate Giving Program Salvation Army $1,450,000  
Southern Company Charitable Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match
Southwest Airlines Co. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000 Also donated 100 round-trip tickets to Houston for Team Rubicon responders
Spectrum Housing Assist Corporate Giving Program Rebuilding Together $350,000 To assist with home repairs and renovations
Stage Stores, Inc. Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $750,000  
Stanley Black & Decker, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Houston ToolBank $75,000 Also a 2:1 employee match, in-kind donations
Starbucks Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $250,000 Also employee match
Strada Education Network Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000  
Stream Cares Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000  
SubscriberWise, Ltd. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Americares $2,500  
Suntory Holdings Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 For recovery efforts in communities affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma
SunTrust Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Sutter Health Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000  
Target Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $3,500,000 Includes in-kind gifts
Taylor Morrison Home Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Also employee and customer contributions
TD Ameritrade Holding Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000 Employee and customer match
TD Charitable Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $125,000  
TechnipFMC plc Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Tegna Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000 Employee match
Tempur Sealy International, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Good360 $1,000,000 Value of bed donations
Tenet Healthcare Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $20,000  
Texas Rangers Baseball Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Also donating proceeds from 9/1-9/3 games
Texas Instruments Incorporated Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $200,000 Employee match ($100,000)
Thrivent Financial for Lutherans Corporate Giving Program Company-Sponsored Foundation Habitat for Humanity, Unknown Recipient(s) $3,000,000 For both Harvey and Irma relief; $1.5 million for employee match; $1 million to support Thrivent members and others to travel to Harvey and Irma affected areas and volunteer with Habitat for Humanity; $500,000 for Habitat for Humanity
Tokio Marine Holdings, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, All Hands Volunteers $250,000  
Toronto-Dominion Bank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Total Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000  
Toyota Motor North America, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $3,000,000  
TransCanada Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee and customer match
The Travelers Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $500,000  
Tribune Media Company Charitable Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, American Red Cross $100,000  
TXU Energy Retail Company LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 Assist customers who need help paying their electric bills in areas hit by Hurricane Harvey
UBS Financial Services Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $250,000 Also employee match
Under Armour, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Team Rubicon $50,000  
Union Pacific Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, Unknown Recipient(s) $250,000 Employee match ($100,000)
United Air Lines, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, AmeriCares, Airlink or Operation USA $100,000 Match first $100,000 donated by MilagePlus members via United's fundraising page
United Rentals, Inc. Contributions Program, Inc. Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000  
UnitedHealth Group Incorporated Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000  
Univision Communications, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $500,000 American Red Cross, Catholic Charities USA, and Texas Diaper Bank ($250,000), in-kind services
UPS Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000  
USANA True Health Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $130,000  
USTA Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient $500,000  
Valero Energy Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000  
ValueMomentum, Inc. Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Team Rubicon $50,000  
Vectren Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $75,000 Employee match ($25,000)
Verizon Communications Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $12,550,000 To four nonprofit agencies TBD; $2,500,000 to Hand in Hand Hurricane Relief Fund; $50,000 to Texas Council on Family Violence for agencies affected by Harvey
Visa Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Also will double-match employee donations to Red Cross
Vistra Energy Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Also clothing and toiletries
Vitol Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee contributions
Vizient Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Corp contributions and employee match. Also employee, member, and supplier contributions
VSP Global Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $5,025,000 $25,000 for employee match; $5 million for VSP network doctors whose businesses have been damaged by Irma and Harvey
Walgreens Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Also donating food items, first aid, and medical equipment
Walmart, Walmart Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Greater Houston Community Foundation, Multiple Recipients $30,000,000 ARC shelters (up to $10 million), GHCF ($2 million); includes second 2:1 customer match of cash and product donations up to $10 million ($20 million total)
Walt Disney Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Waste Management, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $3,000,000  
Watercrest Senior Living Group, LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Samaritan's Purse, Unknown Recipient(s) $110,000 Fundraising campaign ($100,000)
Waterton Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000  
Wawanesa Mutual Insurance Company Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $10,000  
Weatherford International, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Feeding Texas, Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $50,000  
Wells Fargo & Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For local nonprofits ($500,000)
Whataburger Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Whataburger Family Foundation, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,650,000 Affected local employees ($1,000,000), Local food banks ($50,000)
Williams Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $500,000  
Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $2,600,000 Cash and in-kind
Wynn Resorts, Limited Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $3,750,000  
Xcel Energy Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Xerox Corporation Contributions Program/strong> Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000 $25,000 each for Harvey and Irma relief, $50,000 employee match
Yara North America, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts
Yardi Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Plus employee match
    TOTAL: $252,652,500  

 

September 11, 2017

Atlanta Falcons (NFL)/Atlanta United (MLS) announce joint contribution of $1 million to help victims of Harvey and Irma, to be split by American Red Cross, United Way, and World Vision.

Apple announces additional $3 million for relief efforts benefiting people affected by Harvey and Irma.

Home Depot Foundation announces additional commitment of $1 million to support hurricane relief efforts, raising total financial support to $2 million for hurricane aid this season.

Walmart announces a second $10 million 2:1 customer match of cash and product donations to support American Red Cross disaster-response efforts.

Updated corporate total: $203,827,500

 

September 12, 2017

Discover Financial Services, which previously had pledged $500,000 to the American Red Cross as part of a cardmember donation matching program, announces additional $1 million pledge to the Red Cross in support of Irma and Harvey relief efforts.

New York Community Bank announces a commitment of $25,000 to Team Rubicon for hurricane relief efforts.

Suntory Holdings announces $1 million donation to American Red Cross for recovery efforts in communities affected by Harvey or Irma.

Updated corporate total: $205,852,500

 

September 15, 2017

The BD Corporate Giving Program announces an employee match, cash, and product donations totaling $700,000 to Americares and organizations TBD for victims of both Harvey and Irma.

The Scotiabank Corporate Giving Program announces a $100,000 pledge to Zina Garrison Tennis & Education Academy.

The BP America Corporate Giving Program announces a $750,000 pledge in support of Harvey relief efforts.

The DentaQuest Corporate Giving Program announces a $1 million pledge to the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation's Rebuild Texas Fund.

Dick's Sporting Goods Foundation and Dick's Sporting Goods, Inc. Corporate Giving Program announce cash and product donations totaling $5.5 million for sports programs affected by Harvey and Irma.

The DentaQuest Corporate Giving Program announces a $1 million pledge to the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation's Rebuild Texas Fund.

The KBR, Inc. Contributions Program announces a commitment of $50,000 to the KBR Charitable Foundation Disaster Relief Fund in support of employees affected by Harvey.

The Merck & Co., Inc. Corporate Giving Program announces a pledge of $1 million to the Hand in Hand Hurricane Relief Fund and $250,000 to multiple recipients for Harvey/Irma relief.

The Red Wing Shoe Company Contributions Program announces product donations worth $500,000 to Good360.

The Rooms to Go Corporate Giving Program announces a $2 million commitment and product donations for Harvey/Irma relief.

The Scotiabank Corporate Giving Program announces a $100,000 pledge to Zina Garrison Tennis & Education Academy.

The Target Corporation, which previously had pledged $500,000, announces an additional $3 million commitment, including in-kind gifts.

The Verizon Communications Inc. Contributions Program, which previously had pledged $10 million, announces additional commitments of $2.5 million and $50,000 to the Texas Council on Family Violence to assist South Texas domestic violence agencies affected by Harvey.

The Xerox Corporation Contributions Program pledges $100,000 to the American Red Cross for Harvey/Irma relief.

Updated corporate total: $220,452,500


September 20, 2017

The Allstate Foundation, which previously pledged $500,000 for Harvey relief efforts, increases its commitment to $750,000 total for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The Amway Corporation Contributions Program announces commitments totaling $250,000 for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP Contributions Program announce a $100,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Bridgestone Americas, Inc. Corporate Giving Program pledges $1 million for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The Ford Motor Company Fund announces a $150,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Kia Motors America, Inc. Contributions Program and Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia Corporate Giving Program announce commitments totaling $300,000 for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The Lundbeck Corporate Giving Program announces pledges totaling $135,000 for Harvey relief efforts.

The Macquarie Group Foundation announces a $100,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Norbord Corporate Giving Program announces a $1 million commitment for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation Contributions Program announces $1.1 million for Harvey relief efforts.

The Novo Nordisk Inc. Contributions Program announces a $100,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Sanofi Foundation for North America announces a $225,000 commitment for Harvey relief efforts.

The VSP Global Corporate Giving Program announces a $150,000 commitment for Harvey relief efforts.

The Yara North America, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $100,000 pledge for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $230,437,500


September 22, 2017

The Andeavor Corporation Contributions Program announces a $1 million commitment for Harvey relief efforts.

The Atlanta Braves Corporate Giving Program announces a $250,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. Contributions Program announces a $500,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Bechtel Group Foundation announces a $1 million commitment for Harvey relief efforts.

The Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc. Contributions Program announces a $200,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Cincinnati Reds LLC Contributions Program announces a $40,000 commitment for Harvey relief efforts.

The D.G. Yuengling & Son, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $50,000 pledge for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $232,352,500


September 25, 2017

The Canadian National Railway Company Contributions Program announces a $75,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Hyundai Motor America Corporate Giving Program, which had pledged $200,000 for Harvey relief efforts, announces an additional $300,000 commitment for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The BBVA Compass Corporate Giving Program and BBVA Compass Foundationannounce commitments totaling $825,000 for Harvey relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $233,552,500


September 28, 2017

Updated corporate total: $252,652,500


Powered by Women: Philanthropy in the Age of Trump Needs to Address Gender

September 08, 2017

Pink_pussy_hatsAttacks on women and gender identity have been central to the policies coming out of the Trump White House. Whether it involves dismantling Title IX, rolling back access to reproductive rights, defunding programs that aim to end gender-based violence, or seeking to ban transgender people from enlisting in the military, this administration has made attacking gender equity a key priority. To respond effectively, the philanthropic sector, too, must make gender justice, in addition to economic and racial justice, a core principle. 

Women have been central to resistance efforts across the country and around the world, with millions participating in Day Without a Woman and the Women's March. In record numbers, more and more of us are becoming engaged in the political process, advocating with state and national elected officials, and running for office. Across the country, ever larger numbers of community leaders are working daily to organize our friends, families, neighbors, and communities. In fact, as I write this, I'm meeting with representatives of hundreds of other women's foundations at the Women's Funding Network conference in San Francisco. All of us are committed to defending democracy, restoring respect, and challenging bigotry, misogyny, and racism.

With the role of gender elevated in our new political normal, philanthropy must address gender and gender issues in its response. Looking to, learning from, and partnering with the women's funding movement will be critical to philanthropy's overall success in the months and years to come. It's a smart and necessary approach because women's foundations:

  • continually engage with and are accountable to the public, listen to our grantee partners and donors, are responsive to the current moment with our program strategies, and pivot quickly as needed;
  • develop and train leaders, building capacity at the local and state levels by supporting leaders who are rooted in their communities;
  • work across issues, making linkages between health, safety, and economic security;
  • are nimble and can deploy money quickly; and
  • can reach small, grassroots organizations, often making the first grants to organizations that go on to be critical to social justice movement advancement.

Today, women's philanthropy is responding to the current political moment in ways that the broader philanthropic sector would be wise to emulate. In this first year of the Trump administration, the women's funding movement is answering the urgent call to step up and support community leaders, centering those who are experiencing attacks, including women, immigrants, people of color, low-wage workers, and LGBT people.

Continue reading »

Philanthropy Teams Up With Institutional Investors to Fight Climate Change

September 07, 2017

Carbon_0As the world works to tackle climate change without the leadership of the U.S. government, there's a growing need to connect philanthropy to institutional investors and catalyze change at a pace rapid enough to be meaningful. Because philanthropy typically is associated with nonprofit activity, that combination may sound surprising. But because climate change represents such an extraordinary threat, it's imperative we compress the dynamics of innovation and scale through new approaches.

That's why Planet Heritage Foundation, where I am the executive director, co-created and funded the launch of Aligned Intermediary, a global investment advisory firm that works with institutional investors to channel capital into "climate infrastructure" sectors such as clean energy, water, and waste-to-value. These investors — sovereign funds, pensions, endowments, insurance companies, family offices, and foundations — represent more than $80 trillion in assets and are the only stakeholders other than governments with the capacity to invest at a scale that can begin to slow and, ultimately, reverse the world's spiraling carbon emissions.

With less than 1 percent of institutional capital currently being deployed to the climate infrastructure space, we simply do not have the luxury of letting markets organically dictate the timing of our climate change actions. The climate infrastructure industry needs to be exponentially ramped up over the next five to ten years, and that will require the development of new financial products, business models, and business practices. Put another way, we need to make institutional investing in climate infrastructure as easy and standardized as investing in global real estate — and we need to do it quickly. Patient capital, the kind provided by foundations and philanthropy, will be critical to those efforts, and jump-starting the flow of it into climate change efforts is crucial.

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The Long Haul: Lessons From Charitable Responses to Previous Disasters

September 06, 2017

Disaster_response2-800x500While media outlets — both online and print — have been quick to offer suggestions as to how individuals should channel their charitable impulses to help those affected by Hurricane Harvey, many Americans have been inspired by the stirring images of neighbors and strangers lending a hand to help each other.

Alexis de Tocqueville, the Frenchman who documented our voluntary impulse during a tour of a young America in the 1830s, would nod knowingly if he were around to see the extraordinary outpouring of generosity we have witnessed since the first days of flooding in Texas.

Time and again over the last twenty years , I've watched Americans respond quickly and generously to a series of natural and man-made disasters. Corporations and foundations also have risen to the occasion, and the lessons they've learned from their responses are of considerable value as we all weigh how to use our resources to the greatest effect in the wake of a disaster like Harvey.

But I've also learned a few things of my own from the responses to disasters like Katrina and the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and would like to share them with you.

Continue reading »

Weekend Link Roundup (September 2-3, 2017)

September 04, 2017

Our weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

RosieClimate Change

Did climate change magnify the destructive power of Hurricane Harvey? Robinson Meyer The Atlantic's Robinson Meyer uncovers a fair amount of evidence which suggests that global warming is making a bad situation worse.

On the Yes! Magazine site, 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben talks with Jacqueline Patterson, director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program about the threat of climate change as a lens to understand many of the injustices confronting the planet.

Collaboration

Which of the following elements of effective collaboration is the most challenging: reaching consensus, bringing diverse perspectives to the table, taking meaningful action? Hop over to the Kauffman Foundation site and cast your vote, then read on to learn how "to apply the principles that matter to move to [a] place where collaboration can happen on a much larger scale." 

Data

Could data science be the key to unlocking the next wave of social change? Elizabeth Good Christopherson, president and chief executive officer of the Rita Allen Foundation, talks with Jake Porway, founder of DataKind, a global network of volunteers skilled in data analysis, coding and visualization, about changes in technology that are influencing the work of his organization and the prospects for accelerated social change.

Disaster Relief

The New York Times has a good roundup of federal assistance for those affected by Hurricane Harvey.

Looking for commonsense advice about the best way to donate to Hurricane Harvey relief and recovery efforts? This article by Pam Fessler on the NPR site is a good place to start.

In a post on Slate, Jonathan M. Katz explains why the Red Cross, the default disaster relief recipient for a majority of corporations and individual Americans, won't "save" Houston.

And in a post on the NCRP site, Ginny Goldman, founder and former director of the Texas Organizing Project, the Houston-based affiliate of the Center for Popular Democracy, reminds Americans that "[w]hen camera crews head home and it's time to rebuild Houston, the people on the ground will need organizing capacity and legal support to fight for themselves." 

Continue reading »

5 Mistakes You’re Making With Your Awareness Campaigns

August 29, 2017

Yell_at_earth_pc_1600_clrWith the busiest fundraising season fast approaching, nonprofit leaders everywhere should be spending much of their time thinking about their end-of-year fundraising campaigns. But when fundraising isn't top of mind, nonprofit leaders often turn their attention to another type of activity: the awareness campaign./p>

Awareness campaigns typically are defined as a sustained effort to educate individuals and boost public awareness about an organization's cause or issue. And in almost every instance they should:

  • target people who share your organization's beliefs and values;
  • educate those potential supporters about your issue or cause; and
  • generate new contacts for your donor database.

A well-executed awareness campaign will accomplish all three of those goals. But there's a caveat: awareness campaigns are easy to get wrong. And who needs that? So what should your organization be doing — and not doing — to raise awareness and acquire new donors? Read on to see whether you're making any of these common mistakes:

1. Your definition of success is too narrow; One of the most common misconceptions about awareness campaigns is that they should be mounted for the sole purpose of, well, raising awareness. But while an awareness campaign can be focused on awareness, there's actually a lot more involved: education (teaching the public about your issue or cause), explaining current events (and how they connect to your issue and efforts), and engagement (soliciting a low-level action on behalf of your organization or cause).

2. You didn't include an action in your materials. Regardless of your issue or cause, an awareness campaign should be designed to move potential supporters from interest to action — that is, from having a general interest in your issue to actually stepping up and doing something on behalf of the issue or cause. The thing to remember about actions in awareness campaigns is that they should be low level. While it's possible someone previously unfamiliar with your organization might be willing to sign up as a volunteer or donate on the spot, it's not usually the case (and shouldn't be something you count on). Instead, actions should be "stepped" like the rungs on a ladder: they should start small and increase in intensity/commitment over time, ultimately leading to concrete support (of time and/or money) for your organization or cause.

Continue reading »

Weekend Link Roundup (August 26-27, 2017)

August 28, 2017

Our weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

Harvey-goes-82517_0Disaster Relief

Harvey has slammed into the Texas Gulf Coast and flooding from the rainfall accompanying the storm appears to be as bad, if not worse, than predicted. NPR has put together a very helpful list of sites and resources for those who would like to help.

Fundraising

The team behind the Fundly blog shares five tips aimed at helping your organization improve its crowdfunding goals. 

International Affairs/Development

The UN Sustainable Development Goals are a framework for what might just be the most ambitious development effort ever. And if that effort is to succeed, every dollar contributed toward one of the goals needs to be spent effectively. On the Triple Pundit site, Mandy Ryan, managing director at Changing Our World, has some good tips for companies looking to align their citizenship work with the SDGs.

And what can we learn from UNLEASH, an "innovation lab" where a thousand young people from a hundred and twenty-nine countries spent ten days in Aarhus, Denmark, developing solutions for the Sustainable Development Goals?  Catherine Cheney reports for Devex.

Journalism/Media

Google News Lab, in partnership with ProPublica, is launching a new, machine learning-powered tool to track reported hate crimes across the country. Taylor Hatmaker reports for Tech Crunch.

We were saddened to learn of the death of Jack Rosenthal, the great  New York Timesman (and our UWS neighbor), at the age of 82. In a long career at the Times, Rosenthal served as urban affairs correspondent in Washington, deputy editorial page editor, editorial page editor, editor of The New York Times Magazine, and president of the New York Times Company Foundation. Eighteen months after 9/11, we had an opportunity to interview him as he was serving in that latter role  an interview that still has much to teach us.

Continue reading »

Newsmakers: Laura Callanan, Founding Partner, UpStart Co-Lab

August 25, 2017

In its most recent Arts & Economic Prosperity report, Americans for the Arts found that the U.S. nonprofit arts and culture industry generated $166.3 billion in economic activity in 2015, prompting Robert Lynch, the organization's president and CEO, to comment, "Leaders who care about community and economic vitality, growing tourism, attracting an innovative workforce, and community engagement can feel good about choosing to invest in the arts."

But where were the impact investments? While the economic importance of the arts has long been recognized, arts-related organization and businesses often fly under the radar when it comes to comprehensive community development, and the relative lack of such investment in the creative economy was one of the things Laura Callanan was determined to explore when she established Upstart Co-Lab in 2016. What's more, Callanan — who majored in theater in college and began her professional career in the financial world, working as an investment banker on Wall Street after graduate school before serving as an endowment manager at the Rockefeller Foundation, a consultant to foundations at McKinsey & Company, and deputy chair of the National Endowment for the Arts — was well positioned to find out.

Earlier this year, Callanan and her colleagues at Upstart Co-Lab released Creative Places & Businesses: Catalyzing Growth in Communities (55 pages, PDF), which identified a $1.54 billion pipeline of more than two dozen projects administered by twenty-two creative places and businesses seeking impact capital. The findings came as a pleasant surprise to many in the arts community, and, according to Callanan, who was recently named to the NonProfit Times' Power & Influence Top 50 list, are a clear sign that the creative economy is ready for impact investment on a significant scale.

PND sat down with Callanan earlier this summer to discuss the findings of the report and the role philanthropy can play in catalyzing impact investments in the creative economy.

Headshot_laura callananPhilanthropy News Digest: The first thing that jumped out at me in the report was the almost complete lack of impact investment in the creative economy, despite the fact that the arts, in the most recent year of record, generated $704 billion in nonprofit and for-profit economic activity, or 4.2 percent of the country's gross domestic product.

Laura Callanan: Actually, since we published the report in April, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Bureau of Economic Analysis have updated their assessment of how much of the U.S. economy is driven by arts and cultural production. It's still 4.2 percent of GDP, but the dollar total is $730 billion, $26 million more than the figure mentioned in the report.

That's the best number currently available on the size of the creative economy, of which the arts are a core part. The National Endowment for the Arts emphasizes music, literature, visual art, and activities related to artistic disciplines. That means it's light on things like fashion, food, furniture making, and some other areas that we at Upstart Co-Lab include in our definition of the creative economy.

PND: That only makes the lack of impact investing in the creative economy more surprising. Why hasn't impact capital been flowing to these areas?

LC: We don't yet have dedicated investment products, investment funds, or investment managers with strategies that make it easy for individuals who are impact investors — or for institu­tions like foundations doing mission-related investing — to target their capital to the creative economy. Yes, an individual investor can buy a share of stock in Etsy, which is a public company, and feel like they're supporting the creative economy. And a foundation can make a program-related investment with a nonprofit arts organization or creativity-based social enterprise. But these one-off investments don't equal scale.

Let me give you an example of why that's a problem. Stockade Works and Stockade Studios in Kingston, New York, were started by the actress Mary Stuart Masterson and her business partner Beth Davenport. Stockade Works is structured as a nonprofit. Stockade Studios is structured as a for-profit social-purpose business. They've been approaching foundations about supporting their efforts to create a film/TV/media hub in the Hudson River Valley. This could be through a grant to the nonprofit, or a program-related investment, or a mission-related investment in the social-purpose business. But a foundation has to know that Stockade Studios exists, so it needs to have an active deal-sourcing process. And then the foundation has to do its own due diligence, its own risk assessment of the oppor­tunity. Plus track performance on the investment once it's made. These are things that an investment manager could do once, and then make the information available to any number of potential investors. Not being able to get information easily is a disincentive to investment.

Today, there are products, funds, and strategies that facilitate impact investment in education, in affordable housing, in support of women and girls, in support of the environment. Not surprisingly, those are all big areas where impact investors are directing their money. And it's not that we can't tweak and re-deploy existing investment products and funds and manager strategies for the creative economy. It's just that it hasn't happened yet.

PND: Looking out five or ten years, would you expect impact investing in the arts and the creative economy to be a focus only for larger foundations, or will foundations of any size have opportunities to participate?

LC: Everyone's able to pursue impact investing, from the individuals who invest $20 in a Calvert Foundation Community Investment Note to ultra-high-net-worth individuals, and from small foundations to some of the largest in the country, like the Ford and Gates foundations. Once we have the dots connected, and the products, funds, and strategies are in place, it won't matter whether you're an individual or an institution, or whether you have a modest amount of capital to deploy or a lot of capital to deploy. People and institutions today should be able to support the creative economy with impact investments just as they can support the environment, affordable housing, education, and other important priority areas.

PND: Do the politics of the moment help or hinder what you're trying to do with Upstart Co-Lab?

LC: To my mind, they shine a bright light on the gap we're trying to fill. There was a story in the Wall Street Journal recently that said: "No matter what the Trump administration does to the Environmental Pro­tection Agency, impact investing for the environment cannot be stopped." Of course, we can’t expect that to be the case if the administration pulls the plug on the National Endowment for the Arts, because impact investing for the creative economy hasn't gotten off the ground. But that just underscores the significance of the opportunity.

The NEA deploys $150 million a year for the arts. That's far less than the $17 billion annually that philanthropy puts into the arts. It's certainly a lot less than $8.8 trillion of impact investing assets under management in the United States today. If we can target a small portion of impact investing assets for creativity — as much, say, as currently flows through crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo — it would be many times more than the budget of the NEA. As a country that cares about free speech, it's important that we support arts and crea­tivity at the federal level. But on a pure dollar basis, there are a lot of resources available in the impact marketplace that can be deployed in support of arts and creativity.

PND: What do you hope to accomplish with the Creative Places & Businesses report?

LC: I hope the report is the beginning of a robust conversation that intro­duces the concept of a "creativity lens" to impact investing and leads, sooner rather than later, to concrete action.

It is incredibly important that any definition of a creativity lens highlights creative places and creative businesses as an important long-time contributor to comprehensive community development. That's why we started the conversation where we did. There's a lot of discussion in the foundation arts community about cultural equity. If we want to shape a creative economy that is inclusive and equitable and sustainable, we have to back up our words with resources.

We know the future of the United States is the creative economy. We're no longer an agrarian economy; we're no longer a manufacturing economy. Today, what we really have is an innovation economy, an ideas economy. But what do we want that economy to look like in the decades to come? Do we want an economy where a few people get paid a lot of money to make apps, and the rest of us are driving for Uber and Lyft and don’t have a retirement plan or health benefits? Or do we want an economy that is inclusive, equitable, and sus­tainable; that is generating quality jobs at every level of the wage scale; and that fully celebrates the imagination and inno­vation that is present in every community in the United States?

PND: Where do you see things going with respect to impact investing and the creative sector?

LC: Upstart Co-Lab has had hundreds of conversations with impact investors and wealth managers over the last couple of years, and they all have clients who have been asking for impact investing opportunities related to arts, culture, and creativity. There's great potential here. Philanthropy did a lot to build the ecosystem of impact investing, social inno­vation, and social entrepreneurship. Arts philanthropy absolutely has a role to play in enabling this new creativity lens for impact investing. The work that philanthropy has done to build thought leadership, technical capacity, and awareness around creative placemaking has been an important early step.

PND: Has it been difficult to build on that early momentum?

LC: It's only just begun! What I'm excited about are the examples, those mentioned in the report and others that I learn about every day. In the last couple of weeks, for instance, I've had a chance to make site visits around New York City and visit Chicago. I see people who are ambitious and thinking big, who see the potential that can be unlocked by connecting impact capital with creative places and businesses. In Chicago, for example, there's an effort under way to redevelop the Avalon Regal Theater. Jerold Gary, an investor-entrepreneur has been actively working in the African-American community on the South Side, investing in residential housing. He had an opportunity to buy the theater — it's a landmarked 1920s property, amazingly detailed, with an ornately painted lobby. In its day, it was a large-capacity venue that drew A-list performers like Ella Fitzgerald and Michael Jackson, but it has been shuttered for quite some time. The good news is that they're on course to re-open the theater by the end of the year.

But it's not just about the theater. The Avalon is an anchor for a whole new cultural corridor on the South Side that's going to include retail space, incubator space where people can do creative work, and a museum of black music. The project is crucial to ensuring that the South Side has a stake in the emerging creative economy, because it's not just about nostalgia and the cultural expression of the past, it's about recognizing that creativity exists in every neighborhood, and that every neighborhood deserves places where people can develop and showcase their creativity.

PND: What role do you see for arts foundations in the development of an impact investing market linked to the creative economy?

LC: Philanthropy played a crucial role in establishing impact investing, social innovation, and social entrepreneurship. It was early philanthropic support that made it possible for people to explore these new ideas, build awareness and understanding, and establish standards, tools, and metrics that enabled the impact investing community to coordinate and grow. And now we see philanthropy taking the next step, bringing more endowment resources to bear on critical issues through mission-related investing. Foundations that support the arts, creativity, and innovation can follow this playbook for the creative economy.

For foundations that have been making traditional grants to the arts — but may not yet be ready to embrace impact investing as a tool to advance their mission — there's a lot to be done by supporting the growing ecosystem, investing in new ideas, investing in thought leader­ship and convening activities, in standards-setting and documentation of the types of projects we describe in the report. I wrote for Grantmakers in the Arts ;about what program officers can do, even if they don't have mission-related investing avail­able to them, and that includes things like making grants to build the ecosystem for impact investing in the creative economy and using their bully pulpit and convening power to spotlight what's happening in creative communities around the country.

One key thing program officers can do is bring to the attention of their fellow grantmakers the artists who are social entre­preneurs who are doing great work. They could be artists focused on the environment and climate change, artists who are focused on reforming the criminal justice system, artists who are focused on immigra­tion. You name it. Folks handing out social entrepreneurship awards always overlook the artist social entrepreneurs.

In short, philanthropy can play an important role in jump-starting the new idea of a creativity lens for impact investing and getting it to a place where the market can take it to scale.

PND: Have we reached a tipping point with respect to how philanthropy views impact investments in the creative economy?

LC: I certainly hope so. And we think there are three reasons why. One: creativity is cool. The excitement around creativity is palpable. You have mayors and governors commissioning creative economy reports and plans. They recognize that creative activity is going to be crucial to building wealth, ensuring social cohesion, and creating quality jobs in their com­mun­ities. When you look at surveys that ask corporate CEOs what will drive business success in the future, creativity in their workforce is top of the list. Just look at how many billions of dollars people have put through platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo — in small increments — to fund creative projects. Even people who don’t think they are particularly creative themselves are happy to invest $25 in someone else’s creativity, whether that's making a film, starting a band, painting a mural, you name it. Creativity is having a moment.

Two: at the same time, impact investing is having a moment. McKinsey & Company, the World Economic Forum, Forbes — all are telling us that impact investing is going mainstream. And as they launch first-time impact investing portfolios, there's no better time to encourage new impact investors to focus on an area that we know they care about: arts, culture, and creativity. As the field of impact investing becomes more devel­oped, there are more targeted opportunities for impact investors to put their money to work: for women and girls, organic food, education, housing, aging in place, sustainable fisheries. These are things that impact investors can support right now. The creative economy is simply too big to be left out of the picture.

The third reason this is a great oppor­tunity is because creative people gravitate toward solving problems, whether that means bringing jobs to the Hudson River Valley or launching an innovation district on the South Side of Chicago. In our research, we identified $1.5 billion in demand for impact capital over the next five years from creative places and businesses catalyzing growth in communities across the U.S. There are investable opportunities searching for values-aligned capital.

At Upstart Co-Lab, we think this is the right moment to apply a creativity lens to impact investing, and we're trying to bring as much energy, intelligence, and workable solutions to the challenge as we can.

— Matt Sinclair

Making Sense: Reflecting on Evaluations at the Jim Joseph Foundation

August 23, 2017

QuestionsanswerssignA core part of the Jim Joseph Foundation's relational approach to grantmaking is supporting the efforts of grantees to evaluate their programs — either through engaging an external evaluator or by collecting and analyzing data internally. The foundation has always believed this is a key part of good grantmaking, in that it builds the capacity of organizations to ask questions, to collect data, and to reflect on findings in a way that then enables them to make changes that increase the chances of success.

In this period of transition at the foundation, the grantmaking team has asked some pertinent questions regarding our own evaluation program: "What are we learning from the evaluation work we have supported over the past eleven years?” And, "Are there common lessons and emerging themes that we should recognize and reflect upon?"

To begin exploring these and other questions, the entire foundation team gathered for a full day earlier this year to share and discuss learnings and common themes discovered from a comprehensive review of nearly all the key evaluations and reports commissioned by the foundation since its inception.

To make the day as productive as possible, the foundation grantmaking team completed "homework" in the weeks leading up to the day-long session, dividing up the responsibility for reviewing a sample of forty-two evaluation reports, capacity-building and business plans, and field-building research reports — all commissioned and completed in the foundation's first eleven years — among team members and asking them to summarize the challenges, outcomes, and successes they identified in their respective documents.

This "day of evaluation reflection" (as we called it) turned out to be well worth the collective time and effort and, importantly, offered space for the team to discuss how the information and lessons that surfaced in our conversations might guide our future work. The summary below includes highlights from those discussions.

The foundation's effect on Jewish life and learning

How has the Jim Joseph Foundation influenced Judaism and Jewish peoples' approach to Jewish life and learning? This overarching question speaks directly to the foundation's mission. A common theme across many of the grants we have funded and evaluated is fostering community and positive relationships within the Jewish community. With few exceptions, evaluations show that participants in foundation-supported programs report feeling more connected to their Jewish identity and to Israel when those are the intended outcomes of the program. Since the DNA of the foundation includes a broad interpretation of and approach to Jewish learning, these programs encompass every kind of setting and activity, from camps, to schools, to service experiences, to Jewish outdoor food and environmental education. And, almost without exception, they have all proved to be effective while remaining aligned with our mission and values.

Lessons learned that have potential to inform foundation grantmaking

Several key themes emerged from the day's discussions that highlight opportunities for reflection, focus, and improvement:

  • Young adult communities can be brought together successfully through different interests and avenues that resonate and are relevant to the lives of young adults. Social justice and service increasingly are reasons for young Jews to engage in Jewish life.  And follow-on programming after an immersive experience is critical to deepening programmatic impact, creating community, and achieving positive outcomes.
  • Successful programs vary in cost and scale, and while immersive programs can be expensive and reach a relatively small number of people, they also tend to have a deep and lasting effect on participants. Other programs, such as doctoral programs in Jewish studies or education, are a longer play, with a relatively high cost per student or participant.
  • Mentorship and time for reflection are key elements in the success of many programs, particularly those focused on educator training. In addition, students value a reputable university program and also desire flexibility and diversity in their program options.
  • Capacity building with respect to evaluation, development, and growth planning can be important investments for grantees. As a relational grantmaker, the Jim Joseph Foundation is in a position to help an organization pivot and/or engage in long-term strategic planning. These plans must be right-sized, however, with realistic revenue targets and investments.
  • Relationships among organizations and people matter. There is value in collaboration and strength in building networks; both also are integral components of successful culture-change initiatives.
  • Some grants are designed to leave a system in place so as to create impact long after the grant period ends. Admittedly, this is an ideal scenario, but local and national funding partners with aligned interests can leverage their resources to both widen and deepen the impact of their grant dollars.

Challenges grantees often encounter

The day also brought to the fore some of the common challenges grantee partners experience.

  • The majority of challenges experienced by the foundation's grantees were related to marketing, recruitment, and retention. Retaining current participants can be just as valuable as bringing in new participants to a program/initiative. Another common challenge relates to hiring and retaining the right personnel — at all levels.
  • Fundraising for sustainability and growth frequently is a challenge — and many effective programs end up being not "sexy" enough for donors.
  • Whole school and/or organizational culture change is an effective way to create impact, but it often involves a lengthy process that requires significant staff capacity and buy-in.

Reflections on evaluation

In discussions about our evaluation support moving forward, the team discussed the importance of elevating the following concepts:

  • Asking good questions and being data informed in our decision-making. Related: evaluations help tell a story for newer foundation staff members about what is working and what is not.
  • It's important to create opportunities for funding to follow what is working — and evaluations can help inform both the "if" and "how" with respect to scaling a pilot program.
  • We should "celebrate failure" in appropriate ways and for the purposes of learning. It's also important to acknowledge that some "failures" actually turned into partial successes years after the grant and evaluation periods had ended. In other words, sometimes an evaluation simply captures a moment in time that may not be representative of the true impact of the program.
  • Field-building research reports frequently raise the profile of certain programs and certain issues — and dissemination is a very important part of the process.
  • Assessing return-on-investment from a grant or series of grants is a daunting challenge. Numbers (e.g., program participants) do not tell the entire story about the long-term effects or how someone's experience influenced their worldview and connection to their faith and community. As a result of its experience, the team reaffirmed our commitment to understand more deeply how Jewish life and learning is experienced and fostered.

Our team viewed the Day of Evaluation Reflection as a productive, enjoyable time for learning. And staff expressed positive sentiments toward the day itself in terms of the structure, presentations, and team-building environment — as well as the preparation process outlined in advance. The conversations we had were open and honest, and signaled that the current grantmaking team is willing to critically examine the foundation's past, current, and future work in a manner that emphasizes transparency, trust, and patience.

The exercise also raised a number of interesting and important questions that we will continue to explore. As is our tradition, we will continue to ask new questions and encourage dialogue as a means to advance our work and deepen our understanding of the most effective ways to practice and evaluate philanthropy.

Headshot_stacie_cherner_156x200Stacie Cherner is senior program officer at the Jim Joseph Foundation.

Embrace Racial Healing to Change Hearts and Minds

August 22, 2017

Hands_photo_from_iStockPrior to the displays of hatred and the tragic loss of Heather Heyer,
a young woman who seemingly embraced the virtues of healing, a transformation was taking place in Charlottesville, Virginia. This college town, where roughly 80 percent of the residents are white, culminated a lawful process in February when its city council voted to remove the statue of Robert E. Lee from a city park.

Passionate acts came from opposing sides, as opponents filed suit
to stop the removal and the city changed the name of Lee Park to Emancipation Park. But there was honest dialogue and truth-telling, the ingredients for healing. Neighbors learned more about one another, their culture, and motivations. But the progress was derailed.

The protesters who converged in Charlottesville were largely white men often perceived as privileged in our society, and among their slogans was "We will not be replaced" by immigrants, blacks, Jews, or homosexuals. Instead of feeling empowered, they were threatened and seemed in pain. Their hearts and minds needed healing.

But racial healing doesn't begin until you intentionally, respectfully, and patiently uncover shared truths, as Charlottesville residents had begun to do before the violence and turmoil. Shared truths are not simply the removal of physical symbols, like monuments. While that may begin to change narratives, it doesn't reach the level of healing that jettisons racism from the land or creates equitable communities. Racism has persevered because remedies ranging from public accommodation laws to Supreme Court rulings are limited in scope and reach: They fail to change hearts and minds.

A new approach is needed that penetrates the full consciousness of our society, draws in all communities, and focuses on racial healing and truth-telling.

Racial healing can facilitate trust and authentic relationships that bridge vast divides created by race, religion, ethnicity, and economic status. Only after truths are shared, racism is acknowledged, and hearts begin to mend will communities begin to heal the wounds of the past and together move forward to address the bias in employment, education, housing, and health that causes widespread disparities and denies opportunities to our children.

To be sure, racial healing is predicated not just on emotional encounters such as saying, "I'm sorry"; rather, it's predicated on truth-telling. But who's truth? We all have our own truths, and we need collective conversations to help us in reaching a common truth and vision for the future based on what we decide.

And while sharing our individual truths requires that we share stories, reaching a common truth is more than a blending of stories. It's about co-creating morals, principles, wisdom, and guidance that is written on our hearts and captured in our faith and how we treat each other as human beings. It is developed by all of us in the courtyard, in town halls, and in living rooms with family and neighbors. That's where we develop "the" truth.

At the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, we promote racial healing because it moves people to act from their hearts. Real change happens when people work together and build relationships. Rarely does it occur when it is forced upon communities by laws and rulings. Last January, WKKF coordinated an annual National Day of Racial Healing that inspired civic, religious, community, and philanthropic organizations to collaborate on activities designed to facilitate racial healing. But we can't wait until next January to embrace racial healing.

Today, with the threat of unrest billowing through communities, our country needs to heal. All sides must air their fears and anxieties, and articulate their visions for a future where all children can thrive.

After centuries of racial hierarchy, all sides have been wounded. Whenever a policy or decision gives privileges to some and not others or perpetuates injustices, the collective community suffers, and part of our common humanity is lost. It leaves some wounded and unable to work toward our collective interest.

What is inspiring is the healing that is happening around the country. Earlier this year, two hundred people gathered at the Chicago Theological Seminary for an extraordinary day of racial healing. People of all races, genders, religions, and ethnicities gathered in healing circles to share their "truths" on the racism they endured or (consciously or unconsciously) unleashed on others. The healing circles were sanctuaries for truth-telling and helped people see one another, acknowledge differences, and begin to build authentic relationships.

WKKF, through our Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation (TRHT) framework, is supporting racial healing in fourteen places where the framework is being implemented. Since 2010, when our America Healing initiative launched, WKKF has actively promoted racial healing and supported racial healing practitioners who are available to help communities, concluding that:

  • Racial healing accelerates human capacity for resilience, for embracing one another, and for reconnecting people who previously had their identities denied back to their roots, culture, language, and rituals.
  • The focus of racial healing is our "collective humanity" and lifting up that which unites us rather than that which divides us, while discovering, respecting, and indeed honoring our unique experiences.
  • Racial healing will facilitate narrative change, which will help everyone in communities articulate the truth about their collective histories and be exposed to full, complete, and accurate representations of themselves and their communities.

Headshot_montgomery_tabronCommunities must heal so they can grow. Let's heal and build sustainable progress neighbor by neighbor, community by community, to transform America so all children can have a brighter future.

La June Montgomery Tabron is president and CEO of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

Social Innovation Exchange and PND: A New Partnership

August 21, 2017

Social_innovationThe social and environmental challenges confronting societies globally are growing in scale and complexity. And no single organization, private or public, is equipped to fight these challenges alone. Which is why it's more important than ever for private- and public-sector organizations to seek and find alignment between their various activities and efforts.

The UK-based Social Innovation Exchange (SIX) is the world's primary network focused on social innovation. Comprised of more than sixteen thousand people who believe in innovation for societal good, SIX works to connect people and organizations globally, build innovation capacity, and provide strategic foresight to the social innovation field. It works to achieve those goals in three ways: 1) through organizational capacity building; 2) by fostering networks of social innovation leaders; and 3) through learning interventions.

Over the past two years, SIX has created something called the SIX Funders Node, a global collective of more than sixty foundations willing to share, learn, and engage with one another in order to be more innovative in their approach and practice.

Through the Funders Node, SIX orchestrates a global peer-to-peer learning exchange, hosts unique activities across the world supporting funders as they work through various challenges, and brokers strategic relationships and partnerships between foundations.

Areas of focus for the initiative have included the roles of foundations in social innovation and understanding how they can best leverage change; the different models and methods of collaboration; understanding the power dynamics within philanthropy; and impact and risk. Last year, SIX hosted a retreat devoted to funding systems change that explored, among other things, definitions of systems change and provided foundation representatives in attendance an opportunity to work through many of the challenges they face internally and to share best practices.

Hosted in collaboration with the Robert Bosch Stiftung and the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation, in partnership with the Breuninger Foundation, the BMW Foundation, and Community Foundations of Canada, our next convening will be a retreat, August 20-23, in Canada focused on the topic "Aligning for Impact."

Following the retreat, SIX and Philanthropy News Digest will partner to share key insights and learnings from the retreat through a series of blog posts, interviews, and other materials, with a focus on three broad themes:

  • Impact
  • Alignment
  • Innovation

Like many of you, members of the Social Innovation Exchange are working to address urgent challenges and believe that there is enormous potential and power in peer learning. We're looking forward to sharing details about the challenges and pain points we face, as well as highlighting new approaches to alignment and opportunities for innovation going forward, and we sincerely hope you’ll join us and participate in that conversation. Stay tuned to this space!

Jordan_Junge_for_PhilanTopicJordan Junge (jordan.junge@socialinnovationexchange.org) is program director at SIX.

Weekend Link Roundup (August 19-20, 2017)

August 20, 2017

Our weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

206_460x460_Front_Color-NACurrent Affairs

The Fuqua School of Business at Duke University has put together a partial list of social impact leaders who spoke out against the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend. The list includes statements by Elisa Villanueva Beard  (CEO, Teach for America), Ben Hecht (CEO, Living Cities), Danyelle Honoré, (President, UVA chapter of the NAACP), Jonathan Reckford (CEO, Habitat for Humanity International), and Kevin Trapani (CEO, Redwoods Group).

Half a dozen Connecticut Council on Philanthropy members also weighed in, including Michael Johnston (President/CEO, Jewish Community Foundation of Greater Hartford), Martha McCoy (Executive Director, Everyday Democracy), and Frances G. Padilla (President, Universal Health Care Foundation of Connecticut)

Other social sector leaders who made powerful statements include Jean Case (CEO, Case Foundation),  Kristen Clarke (President/ED, Lawyers Committe for Civil Rights Under Law), Aaron Dorfman (Executive Director, National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy), Grant Oliphant (President, Heinz Endowments), and Rip Rapson (CEO, Kresge Foundation).

The violence in Charlottesville prompted the American Civil Liberties Union, on Thursday, to announce that it would no longer represent white supremacist groups that protest with guns. The PBS NewsHour's Joshua Barajas has the story.

In the Daily Dot, Andrew Wyrich explains why there's no such thing as the "alt-left."

On her Philanthropy 2173 blog, Lucy Bernholz reminds us that "Racism is a problem created by white people. People of color suffer, but white people are the ones who created it, benefit from it, perpetuate it, and, I believe, also suffer from it. None of us are free when some are not. It's not enough to say this, we need to act to change it, persistently and continuously...." 

Education

From 2003-2015, U.S. reading scores on the two most respected achievement tests, the NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress) and the PISA (Program for International Student Assessment), remained essentially flat. So why aren't we making any progress? The answer, according to Paula J. Schwanenflugel, PhD, and Nancy Flanagan Knapp, PhD, writing in Psychology Today, is pretty straightforward: poverty.

Environment

The Society of Environmental Journalists is proud to present the winners of the 2016-2017 Awards for Reporting on the Environment. Congratulations to the winners!

International Affairs/Development

Convinced that the United States is losing the war of ideas in the Middle East, the Center for American Progress has issued a new guide to countering extremism in the region.

So you want to change the world and know exactly how to do it? Entrepreneur magazine's Jeffery Hayzlett shares five things you should consider before you get started.

And in Good Housekeeping, Melinda Gates, who knows a thing or two about the subject, shares her top ten tips for making the world a better place.

Philanthropy

On his Nonprofit Chronicles blog, Marc Gunther profiles Unorthodox Philanthropy, a program of the San Francisco-based Lampert Byrd Foundation that, in the words of founder Mark Lampert, looks for "opportunities with the greatest potential exist where others aren't looking."

In Fast Company, Ben Paynter reports on the work of a handful of foundations, including Ford and Omidyar Network, that are leading the charge into the brave new world of impact investment. And The Economist reports that even the Catholic Church is dipping its toes into the impact investing water.

The always level-headed Bruce DeBoskey has some good advice for families looking to engage "rising-generation members" in a mutigenerational family endeavor like philanthropy.

And Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors has three tips for NextGen philanthropists.

That's it for this week. Got something you'd like to share? Drop us a line at mfn@foundationcenter.org.

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Quote of the Week

  • "[W]hat struck me was the startled awareness that one day something, whatever it might be, was going to interrupt my leisurely progress. It sounds trite, yet I can only say that I realized for the first time that I don't have forever...."

    — Anatole Broyard, book critic/editor/essayist (1920-1990)

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